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Jordangray25

Help. Signal Relay location. Help.

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I can't locate the relay for my turn signals. Rear passenger turn signal is not blinking and front passer signal is blinking fast. I have checked the fuse and replaced all the bulbs.

 

Anyone have a diagram or picture of where the relay is??? Manual doesn't show and I have taken enough parts off to look under the steering wheel but can't seem to find it.

 

Any and all help is appreciated.

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The turn signals/hazards are controlled by the SJB, not a relay. Do you have halogens only, or LEDs mixed in also? LEDs in the circuit can cause the SJB to act up.

 

 

Principles of Operation

The smart junction box (SJB) monitors the multifunction switch position by sending multiple voltage reference signals to the multifunction switch. When the multifunction switch is in the LH or RH TURN positions, or the hazard lamp switch is pressed, that input signal is routed to ground.

 

When the SJB receives a request for a turn signal or hazard lamps, the SJB supplies voltage to the appropriate turn lamps.

 

The timed on/off cycle is determined by the SJB and is set to flash approximately 80 times per minute if both the front and rear turn lamps operate correctly. If an individual turn signal lamp is inoperative, the SJB flashes the remaining turn lamp approximately 160 times per minute.

 

Field-Effect Transistor (FET) Protection

The SJB utilizes a FET protective circuit strategy for many of its outputs (for example, the headlamp output circuit). Output loads (current level) are monitored for excessive current (typically short circuits) and are shut down (turns off the voltage or ground provided by the module) when a fault is detected. A continuous DTC is stored at that time for the fault. The circuit will then reset after a customer demand of the function (switching the component on, battery saver being energized). When an excessive circuit load occurs several times, the module shuts down the output until a repair procedure is carried out. At the same time, the continuous DTC that was stored on the first failure will not clear by a command to clear the continuous DTCs. The module will not allow this code to be cleared or the circuit restored to normal operation until a successful on-demand self-test proves that the fault has been repaired. After the on-demand self-test has successfully completed (no on-demand DTCs present), the continuous DTC will have been cleared and the circuit function will return.

 

Each circuit has three predefined levels of short circuit tolerance established in the module based on each circuits' capability. When the first or second level is reached, the continuous DTC associated with the circuit sets along with DTC B106E. These DTCs may be cleared using the Clear DTC operation on the scan tool as long as the fault itself has been corrected. If any of the circuits are shorted past the third level, then B106F sets along with the associated continuous DTC. This DTC cannot be cleared and the module must be replaced.

 

The SJB FET protected output circuits for the turn lamp system are for the LH front turn lamp output and the RH front turn lamp output circuits. The rear turn lamps utilize the stoplamp circuitry and are also protected. For additional information regarding the rear stop lamps, refer to Stoplamps in this section.

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I have Halogens only. Do I replace the SJB?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The turn signals/hazards are controlled by the SJB, not a relay. Do you have halogens only, or LEDs mixed in also? LEDs in the circuit can cause the SJB to act up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Principles of Operation

The smart junction box (SJB) monitors the multifunction switch position by sending multiple voltage reference signals to the multifunction switch. When the multifunction switch is in the LH or RH TURN positions, or the hazard lamp switch is pressed, that input signal is routed to ground.

 

When the SJB receives a request for a turn signal or hazard lamps, the SJB supplies voltage to the appropriate turn lamps.

 

The timed on/off cycle is determined by the SJB and is set to flash approximately 80 times per minute if both the front and rear turn lamps operate correctly. If an individual turn signal lamp is inoperative, the SJB flashes the remaining turn lamp approximately 160 times per minute.

 

Field-Effect Transistor (FET) Protection

The SJB utilizes a FET protective circuit strategy for many of its outputs (for example, the headlamp output circuit). Output loads (current level) are monitored for excessive current (typically short circuits) and are shut down (turns off the voltage or ground provided by the module) when a fault is detected. A continuous DTC is stored at that time for the fault. The circuit will then reset after a customer demand of the function (switching the component on, battery saver being energized). When an excessive circuit load occurs several times, the module shuts down the output until a repair procedure is carried out. At the same time, the continuous DTC that was stored on the first failure will not clear by a command to clear the continuous DTCs. The module will not allow this code to be cleared or the circuit restored to normal operation until a successful on-demand self-test proves that the fault has been repaired. After the on-demand self-test has successfully completed (no on-demand DTCs present), the continuous DTC will have been cleared and the circuit function will return.

 

Each circuit has three predefined levels of short circuit tolerance established in the module based on each circuits' capability. When the first or second level is reached, the continuous DTC associated with the circuit sets along with DTC B106E. These DTCs may be cleared using the Clear DTC operation on the scan tool as long as the fault itself has been corrected. If any of the circuits are shorted past the third level, then B106F sets along with the associated continuous DTC. This DTC cannot be cleared and the module must be replaced.

 

The SJB FET protected output circuits for the turn lamp system are for the LH front turn lamp output and the RH front turn lamp output circuits. The rear turn lamps utilize the stoplamp circuitry and are also protected. For additional information regarding the rear stop lamps, refer to Stoplamps in this section.

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The SJB has to be replaced by a dealer or a shop with access to IDS scan tools. I am not saying that it IS the problem, because it could be wiring issues anywhere along the path.

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Can a weak battery cause this? Old old is your battery?

Edited by enigma-2

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If the turn signals are controlled by a module instead of a relay, could you do something like this if you knew where the proper board was on the SJB?

 

http://acurazine.com/forums/third-generation-tl-2004-2008-93/g-109-diy-eliminate-led-bulb-induced-hyper-flashing-without-load-resistors-815219/

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Certainly, if the parts can be sourced, they can be replaced. Nobody's dug into the physical layout of the SJB that I know of, though.

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You might want to check the bulb sockets for overheating or corrosion. Poor connections to the bulbs could cause your issues.

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Had the same problem on my 57 T-Bird. I know that's old tech, but it's still the same problem.. Found that the bulb was not making good contact with the electrodes in the socket. Had to add a bit of height to the bulb contacts for a better fit. Problem solved.

 

Burke

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