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Ginger Smith

Is engine braking going downhill normal? 2016 2.0 Ecoboost

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I've notice that when coasting downhill seems like my 2016 edge with the 2.0 ecoboost downshifts to slow the vehicle. In my 2008 Sable I can coast freely downhills and pick up speed. I drive the same route in both vehicles back & forth to work with some moderate hills. I hadn't noticed the drag going downhill in the Edge until just recently. Is this normal?

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I have a 2011 Limited and it does that also. I think it's normal. I have a BMW that also does the downshift at the same point on the same hill

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It's normal. I think it only engages if you're using cruise control or you tap the brake.

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actually I'm driving in town. coming out of a roundabout I have a down hill, doing about 30 mph starting out, no cruise, no braking, in my Sable I coast to 45 before starting the uphill, in the Edge, it keeps my speed around 35 mph. I can feel the engine braking kick in after a few mph increase while coasting. Wonder why it does that, thought about shifting into neutral but I've heard that's not a good thing to do. Can't be helping gas mileage.

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Ok, I am not finding it in the manual, but recent Fords have 2 newer features that have an affect to what you feel:

1) Aggressive Deceleration Fuel Shut-off (ADFSO), when costing the fuel supply is cut-off completely to save fuel which would feel like engine braking, completely normal.

 

2) When coasting, even in "D" without cruise control, the transmission (as far as I know) does actually downshift to reduce vehicle over speeding when coasting downhill. I think it detects being on a downgrade & hence shifts differently.

 

I drove a 1999 Mercury Sable for a few years and remember how it used to coast, the car would seem like it doesn't slow down without brakes, a complete opposite to newer Fords.

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actually I'm driving in town. coming out of a roundabout I have a down hill, doing about 30 mph starting out, no cruise, no braking, in my Sable I coast to 45 before starting the uphill, in the Edge, it keeps my speed around 35 mph. I can feel the engine braking kick in after a few mph increase while coasting. Wonder why it does that, thought about shifting into neutral but I've heard that's not a good thing to do. Can't be helping gas mileage.

 

Actually it's done specifically to improve fuel economy. As omar302 points out, it's cutting off all fuel, so you're fuel economy going downhill is literally infinite, you're not burning anything at all. In your Sable it was likely still injecting just enough fuel to keep the engine running along, so even though you were picking up speed, your net fuel use is more. If you put the Edge in neutral it will start burning fuel again to keep the engine idling, so again your burning more.

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I've notice that when coasting downhill seems like my 2016 edge with the 2.0 ecoboost downshifts to slow the vehicle. In my 2008 Sable I can coast freely downhills and pick up speed. I drive the same route in both vehicles back & forth to work with some moderate hills. I hadn't noticed the drag going downhill in the Edge until just recently. Is this normal?

 

Yes, it is normal for the car to decelerate going downhill. My 2016 does just that. I do remember reading it in the manual..... but I just can't remember where it talks about it. In a nutshell, your Edge is normal.

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Thanks everyone for clearing this up. I was concerned that something may have been going on with my Edge.

Not sure I agree with the theory, why can't the gas be cut off and still free wheel and pick up speed when going downhill?

In my Sable I can pick up 10 mph and coast well into the ensuing uphill before having to touch the accelerator to maintain the speed limit.

Edited by Ginger Smith

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Source

 

We are deploying Aggressive Deceleration Fuel Shut-Off technology to improve fuel efficiency. ADFSO allows fuel supply to the engine to be shut off during vehicle deceleration and then automatically restarted when needed for acceleration or when the vehicles speed approaches zero. This new system builds on the Deceleration Fuel Shut-Off technology available in our existing vehicles by extending the fuel shut-off feature to lower speeds and more types of common driving conditions, without compromising driving performance or emission.

 

This improved fuel shut-off will increase fuel economy by an average of 1 percent. An additional benefit is increased deceleration rates, which should extend brake life and improve speed control on undulating roads.

 

Starting in 2008 this technology was implemented on the Ford Flex, F-150, Expedition and Escape and the Lincoln MKS and Navigator. We are continuing to implement it as we bring out new vehicles. For example, the 2011 Ford Edge, Ford Explorer and Lincoln MKX use ADFSO. The ADFSO technology will be a standard feature in all of our North American vehicles by 2015, and we will continue to expand implementation globally.

 

Not sure I agree with the theory, why can't the gas be cut off and still free wheel and pick up speed when going downhill?

The Engine without fuel is like a big pump that requires energy to turn, this energy it taken from the cars "coasting" momentum, hence slowing it down.

Edited by omar302
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Thanks for the information, I feel smarter today! :victory:

 

So would shifting into neutral going downhill and gaining speed further increase gas mileage or would that cause damage to the car?

 

I actually get a little better mileage in my 2008 3.5L Duratec V6 Sabel going back and forth to work through town than I do in the 2.0 Eco Edge.

Edited by Ginger Smith

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Shifting into neutral defeats the fuel cutoff. Waldo explained it above.

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So I guess without fuel and the wheels not connected the engine dies without fuel?

Maybe an auto restart as in hybrids?

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Yes, without the transmission engaged to turn the engine the engine would die in neutral without fuel.

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