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Thermostat 2016 Edge Sport

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Tried to do the thermostat install today.

 

No way. Not happening. Following the instructions by special K, and the motor mount would not budge. not one bit. I spent the better half of a few hours trying to get the motor mount free to access the thermostat housing. I may go back into it tomorrow, this time by pulling the passenger wheel off and removing the plastic fender well and getting to it from the "front" of the t-stat housing. Absolutely no amount of prying, persuading, pulling, jacking, lowering would allow that thing to budge more than a few millimeters. there is no room to "pry" as suggested without some kind of tool that I don't have in my arsenal. at this point, i've used every vulgar word in my dictionary and my back is killing me. I've had a lot of PITA projects working with vehicles, and there are very few that i would not recommend trying at home. this is one of them.

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Tried to do the thermostat install today.

 

No way. Not happening. Following the instructions by special K, and the motor mount would not budge. not one bit. I spent the better half of a few hours trying to get the motor mount free to access the thermostat housing. I may go back into it tomorrow, this time by pulling the passenger wheel off and removing the plastic fender well and getting to it from the "front" of the t-stat housing. Absolutely no amount of prying, persuading, pulling, jacking, lowering would allow that thing to budge more than a few millimeters. there is no room to "pry" as suggested without some kind of tool that I don't have in my arsenal. at this point, i've used every vulgar word in my dictionary and my back is killing me. I've had a lot of PITA projects working with vehicles, and there are very few that i would not recommend trying at home. this is one of them.

 

 

This is a fairly easy job, and most have done it themselves. Did you try to put a piece of wood on a jack and jack the engine up via the oil pan to take the weight off the engine mount. I just did one for a local at the shop and it took about 45 min, with a beer break ;-).

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This is a fairly easy job, and most have done it themselves. Did you try to put a piece of wood on a jack and jack the engine up via the oil pan to take the weight off the engine mount. I just did one for a local at the shop and it took about 45 min, with a beer break ;-).

I agree it should be simple. compared to some of the european crap i've worked on and dealt with throughout the years. 6 bolts is not a difficult task.

 

but yes, wood under the pan. Jacked to every position from not touching, to the body beginning to lift (which is obviously not good for the plastic oil pan on these). Can we go back to the days of big block/small block and a carb yet? ok, ok maybe not that extreme.

 

of course the rains rolled in today, so I'm unable to mess with it until tomorrow.

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I guess I'm here to reiterate, that this will NOT come off. I had 2 jacks under the car attempting to support the engine. What is happening is when I remove the nuts off the studs, the engine sinks down putting it in a bind. i have 2 jacks, how is this possible. so I had the wife come out and loosen the last nut while i take a look at what happens. the car is lifting when she is taking the nut off, still putting it in a bind.. What am i missing here? I have pressure on the jacks, but why would the body lift? it has officially defied the laws of physics just to piss me off.

 

 

I did the Tstat install. But differently. I drained the radiator, removed the reservoir tank and twisted my hands in every position to remove the 2 bolts on the housing, but was able to do it. I was weary of putting any pressure on the plastic oil pan for removing the engine mount. The good thing is if you drop anything it falls straight down to the floor.

 

I'm going to have to try your method. I'm having a hell of a time here. How did you manage to thread the lower bolt on the housing back in? that is my main concern with doing it your way. Top bolt is simple enough.

 

Edit: I had the wife come out with her tiny hands to get that lower bolt. she had no problem, and called me "fat hands". That's real nice...

Edited by Mikula
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170*

As requested by Mikula.

 

post-46130-0-30999800-1524799183_thumb.jpg post-46130-0-43327600-1524799226_thumb.jpg

Edited by Xtra
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thermostathousing.png

Interestingly enough, this picture is incorrect.

 

I just went to the dealer to buy a new o-ring. He initially printed me this exact same photo on the placement of the o-ring. Then I asked him for the torque specs of the 2 bolts.

 

get this... when he brings up that info, the picture shows the o-ring on the outside. Asked twice to confirm we were looking at the 2.7L ecoboost for 2015+ ford edge on both photos, and we were.

 

After installing the o-ring the way this photo shows, it is leaking. Evidently it is incorrect.

 

To those taking on this job, please ignore the photo in post 43.. and wizard, maybe add an edit in there stating that as well.

 

Also, the torque specs for the 2 bolts on the housing are 89in lbs (that is inch pounds in case you missed it)

 

89 inch lbs

Edited by Mikula
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I'd like to edit or add my own "How To" in this thread, for those that do not want, or are having issues with removing the motor mount as suggested in post 46.

 

Start by removing the plastic cover underneath the vehicle. There is more than one cover, so to be clear, do not remove the one attached to the front bumper. We are removing the cover that is covering the passenger side of the oil pan. The reason for doing this is so that when you remove the tstat, you have a place to catch the coolant with oil drain pans, or those throw away aluminum pans people cook turkeys in!

 

a secondary option (and my preference) is to not remove the lower cover, but to buy some pig mat (amazon has some rolls for pretty cheap). This stuff is incredibly absorbent. I've been using it for years in a machine shop and I swear by the stuff. Take the pads and jam them underneath the area you will be working in. covering your pulleys, belts, and sensors when you can.

 

next, remove the bolt on the coolant reservoir (it is on the back side). remove the plug on the rear of the reservoir (it is just a push pin style to keep it from bouncing around). Now the reservoir is held in place on the front passenger side corner near the bottom. lifting up on that corner will make it come free.

 

Moving the reservoir out of that area (carefully of course) will allow you to get your arm in there and remove the thermostat the way DTMF suggests in post 47. However, there is no need to drain the radiator. I removed the bottom bolt from the thermostat housing first (because that one is a bit more difficult. Smaller hands will help you out here. I had to get the wife) You will begin to lose fluid here. keep pressure on the tstat housing whenever you can.

 

You will not be able to use an extension or deep socket to get to the bolt. there is just enough room to use a regular "short" socket (8mm I believe) and back it out all of the way.

 

Then move on to the top bolt on the housing. keeping pressure on the housing with one hand, while removing the bolt with the other hand, will minimize the amount of coolant lost.

 

One thing to mention, have your new thermostat lying nearby. The quicker you do the swap, the less fluid you will lose. Also, make sure the "nipple" on the thermostat is facing up when you assemble it.

 

Pull the housing back, remove the old tstat, and remove the o-ring gastket. It may still be attached to the t-stat, or it may be on the housing. put the new t-stat in place (again with the nipple facing upward, and the spring toward the motor). Then place the o-ring onto the thermostat, making sure it seats in there, then put the housing in place. Put your bolts back in and move back and forth when tightening to be sure it puts even pressure on both sides. Torque to 89 inch pounds.

 

remove your rags if necessary, put your reservoir back in place, fill the reservoir between "min" and "max". leave the cap off at this time, and start the vehicle. If the fluid goes down, add to get into range again.

 

Here is where I've heard differing opinions. Because the system is self burping, you can put the cap back on and let the vehicle idle until it gets to temperature. that obviously makes it difficult to add fluid if necessary, so i prefer to leave the cap off (or very loose) for the first 15-20 minutes, again adding fluid if necessary. I will also turn the heat on full blast after about 10 minutes of idle. Put the cap on the reservoir about the 20 minute mark.

 

Total idle time was a half hour (which my vehicle automatically shut off at this point)

 

let it cool, add fluid if necessary, check for leaks, replace the cover underneath if you removed it, and go for a test drive around the neighborhood. Make sure you get it up to temperature during this drive. Keep your eye on the gauge as it may fluctuate as air moves through the system. If it spikes to hot, just be sure it is a bubble, and not a failure of some kind.

 

park it, and let it cool again. add fluid if necessary, and you should be good to go. Hope this helps someone!

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To those taking on this job, please ignore the photo in post 43.. and wizard, maybe add an edit in there stating that as well.

 

 

 

I added a note to the original post to see your post about the o-ring.

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Reische Performance 170F - Ordered and added to the pile of parts to install.

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At long last I got around to installing the Reische Performance 170F TStat . Got it done before the custom tune .


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On 8/22/2017 at 11:58 AM, snmjim said:

So in keeping with the Xtra & Wizard tradition of Show & Tell... :);)B) along with my promise to provide clarifying instructions...here are some instructions for the T-Stat replacement of which I elected to go with the 170 per Unleashed Tuning recommendation, BTW, I live in Maryland:

 

Note, everything is simple when you know how to do it, so come on people lets help our fellow enthusiast out with some clarifying instructions... :clapping::ford:

2016 Ford Edge Sport Thermostat R&R.pdf

 

Morning snmjim,

 

Whenever you get a chance can you re up your 2016 Ford Edge Sport Thermostat R&R pdf? The current link does not work. Thanks in advance.

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Thinking about installing the lms tune/160 tstat combo. Reading through the thread, has anyone had any issues after instal? I live in the Bay Area and often go to Tahoe in the winter. My concerns are negitive effects on the ECU’s as xtra touched on and if it would be in my best interest to go back to stock tstat when I go to the mountains where it is much colder.  My 2015 is otherwise stock except for an axel back exhaust. 

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11 hours ago, Cree said:

Thinking about installing the lms tune/160 tstat combo. Reading through the thread, has anyone had any issues after instal? I live in the Bay Area and often go to Tahoe in the winter. My concerns are negitive effects on the ECU’s as xtra touched on and if it would be in my best interest to go back to stock tstat when I go to the mountains where it is much colder.  My 2015 is otherwise stock except for an axel back exhaust. 

 

This is a topic best discussed with your Tuner of choice however, I have found that with geographical differences in temperature 170 seems to be the preference of Tuners.

 

Note:  Today's engines require achieving a specific operational temperature range in order to operate properly, too cold or too hot and you will not make maximum power or efficiency. ..:hat_tip:

Edited by snmjim
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53 minutes ago, boostededge said:

Why does this require the fans to be adjusted? 

 

It's not required but if your changing the T-Stat to run cooler then you should be aware that the fans & AGS operate in conjunction with that and to optimize your intent to run cooler you may want to consider adjusting the settings for the fans & AGS...:2thumbs:

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Thermostat is only good for starting the flow across the radiator earlier.  The fans do the real work.  You want to significantly enhance cooling?  Have the fans come on earlier and stay on longer.  Works well with a colder TStat.

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I just did my thermostat install today. It wasn’t that bad really. Like another poster on here I unbolted the reservoir and the throttle intake tube and moved them out of the way. The top bolt is easy and bottom one I just played the game of hit or miss until I got on it with the ratchet. Hardest part was getting the bottom bolt back in and started but I managed ok. Took me about 50 minutes. I wish I would have gotten the absorbent pads that someone else mentioned, I just let it all drain out the bottom. 

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EDIT: Re-read and found the information...sorry.

Edited by tseller
Found it.

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Yes, I know this is an old thread but it is a current subject of real interest for me since I've just moved to a warmer climate. I did a little Forscan data acquisition on the way to work today and found that with the original Thermostat the coolant temperature hangs between 196 and 199 once up to temp, while the cylinder heat temperature sensor normally hangs around 210, but jumped as high as 230 approximately when I was standing on the loud pedal and quickly dropped to normal when returning to cruise state.. throughout which time the coolant temperature only bumped about 1 degree. This tells us that the cooling system has plenty of heat dump available to keep CHT spikes in check. But, a cooler stat will, through an increased temperature differential, be better able to suck that heat out of the head and remain both safe (no detonation) and efficient (max timing available).

 

If i were a betting man, I'd wager the PCM uses cylinder head temp (& knock sensors) to determine if the timing needs to he backed off for structural integrity purposes, and that value is best controlled by reducing coolant temperature, and a cooler stat helps with that.

Screenshot_20210427-072432_FORScan Lite.jpg

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yes knock sensors are integral to the amount of timing advance / retard.

 

the tstat is the first step.  next is having the fans come on earlier and stay on longer, if you like to frequently stomp on the happy pedal. finally, get a better intercooler. all having been developed and put in production already.

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55 minutes ago, WWWPerfA_ZN0W said:

yes knock sensors are integral to the amount of timing advance / retard.

 

the tstat is the first step.  next is having the fans come on earlier and stay on longer, if you like to frequently stomp on the happy pedal. finally, get a better intercooler. all having been developed and put in production already.

The fan kick in temp is really only relevant when high ambient temperature and/or low air speed collectively add up to reduce the heat removal capabilities of the radiator and intercooler. 

 

Regarding the intercooler, I have thought about installing a bank of nozzles to fog the charge cooler when full boogie is needed (like they did with the first stock GT3000 VR4 with nitrous fogging to get it over 200 mph) though I'd probably use washer fluid for cheap reasons

 

But the truth is that I am not in need of more power than this thing makes on a good day,  I just want to not lose power on hot days and maintain a long service life.

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