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Edgingage

Different offset and center bore rims: is it safe?

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Happy New Year, folks!

 

I've been reading looking for advise to upsize the wheels in my 2011 Edge SEL and OEM rims 18"x8" w/+40mm offset and 63.4mm center bore (according to "Wheel-size") and 245/60R18 tires on them. I believe this Edge models can admit up to 22" wheels with no problem; therefore my concern is not just about the wheel size, but about other specs like offset, center bore, rubbing caliber, etc.

 

I'm tented to pull the trigger on a set of used chrome rims at a tenting price from a local private vendor who removed them from his 2008 Dodge Nitro. These rims are 20"x8.5" w/ a smaller offset (+35mm) and a bigger center bore (72.6mm), planning to mount 245/50R20 tires on them.

 

My main concern (where I will mostly appreciate all your help) is about the safety of putting those 08 Nitro rims in my 11 Edge, with such differences in offset and center bore. Does this sound safe or it's a "no-no"? Is that variation in offset and center bore safely admissible?

 

Your thoughts, comments and/or advise are greatly appreciated in advance.

Edited by Edgingage

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The smaller number pushes the rims further out from the hub, a good thing since the rim is wider. With adapters, the larger center bore should be no problem. Would advise wirewheeling the hubs and greasing them before putting the adapters on, though, so they don't get locked together.

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Yea, the offset seems fine since the wheel is 1/2" wider.

 

You need to see if you can find hubrings to take up the gap between the car's 63.4mm hub and the wheel's 72.6mm center bore. They are a PITA to use, but it'll get the wheel centered perfectly. I'd get metal ones if possible (as opposed to plastic) and throw a light coat of anti-seize on them.

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Thanks for your prompt replies and advise, folks. Will do.

 

IWRBB, when I search or ask for metal hub rings, what specifically should I ask for (size wise): for 63.4mm or 72.6 mm ones? It's probably a stupid question but I'd like to make sure.

 

I have one more question that I mentioned but forgot to specifically ask above it (sorry):

 

What about the probability or risk that the inner part of the rim may rub against the caliper? Any way for me to know, check or somehow find out before buying them? I've read that has happened to some people before (rims rubbing against the front calipers).

 

Thanks again in advance for any thoughts, advise or suggestions.

Edited by Edgingage

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The hubs rings will be listed by both sizes, since both are applicable. It will have a 63.4mm inner diameter and a 72.6mm outer diameter.

 

It's an 18" wheel, so I highly doubt your brakes will rub. You can always test fit it before you put tires on them to make sure.

 

Here are some plastic ones for example.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Pieces-Centric-72-6mm-63-4mm-Yellow/dp/B01E3Q8S46/

Edited by IWRBB
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Great help, folks!

 

If I can't find the metal ones I'll grab the plastic ones then.

 

Now, ...more questions (sorry ;)

 

I did a quick search in Amazon Canada and couldn't find any hubcentrics with the exact measurement in metal; there are in polycarbonate. My question here: can I use metals with a slight variation in measurements? Probably yes, I guess. Basically, is it better to use metal ones with a slight variation in measurements or plastic ones with the exact measurements?

 

Second question: I think the sickness of those rings will push the rim/wheel further out. Given the fact that those rims are going to be already out by +5mm from the original OEM spec (due to its only +35mm offset compared to its +40mm offset OEM rims), adding those more mm from the rings (couldn't find its exact thickness), is it still safe? If I figure that out correctly, at the end (adding also the hubcentric ring thickness or width mm) the rims will be pushed out at least +10mm from its OEM position. Is it still mechanically or safely OK?

 

Thanks in advance for further comments, explanations and advise, folks.

Edited by Edgingage

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If the hub rings push the wheel out, then your wheel will fall off rather quickly. Hub rings should never extend beyond the mounting surface of the wheel.

 

A lot of people don't understand the mechanics of what holds a wheel onto a vehicle. It's not the hub or the lug nuts that prevent the wheels from falling off, it's the friction between the back of the wheel and the mounting surface on the brake rotor/drum. The lug nuts just create the clamping load that creates that friction. The hub itself does not support any load, it only serves to help center the wheel when mounting it. But that's also why lug nuts have a taper, so that if you carefully install the wheel by tightening the lugs in a star pattern, the wheel will center itself. So hub rings are not really necessary. But if you want one to help you better install the wheel, then a plastic one with exact dimensions is far more helpful than a metal one with wrong dimensions.

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All good comments and excellent explanations. I think I understood well. I'll take it like a project that could save me money... or throw it away! Let's see how it goes.

 

Thank you WWWPerf_AZN0W, IWRBB and Waldo for all your time explaining and sharing valuable info.

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