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FordeEdge 2011 AC blower turns on and Off

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I have a 2011 Ford Edge Limited. I'm having an electrical or computer problem which I can't seem to figure out. This may or may not have to do with the SYNC display, but that is where most things are noticeable, so that's what I'll be talking about. The interior cabin fan runs sporadically, turning off and on. The levels of blowing work fine. On the display itself, the clock and temp blink on and off. The ambient cabin lights blink on and off. So basically, the cabin ambient lighting, fans and clock all turn off and on. Everything else works. The radio and CD play fine. I can bluetooth to my phones and play music without a problem (at least no more of a problem than SYNC normally has). My navigation works fine. My air conditioning and heat both work, though the fan that blows them is the one that turns off and on. Also my temp within the cabin doesn't work, so I either have to set the temperature to LOW or HIGH to get any real change in temperature in the cabin. I'm not the most mechanically inclined, but hoping it's a simple thing like changing a fuse or something. More likely I'm thinking it's a bigger problem, but I have no idea what that would be (motherboard or something else?) and no idea how to diagnose it. Have others had this problem, as I can't seem to find it anywhere on Google? Any suggestions will be a big help

Edited by TARiQ

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Found an issue with HVAC control module.  It is not communicating to diagnostic tools and showing 133 errors. Not sure where is it or how to diagnose it?

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TARiQ did you ever get an answer? I have a 2011 Ford Edge Limited. I just bought from my mom in November and all of these same things started a couple of moths ago. I took it to a mechanic and he had 200+ errors pull. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

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⁸It really sounds like the HVAC control module is suspect. (A failing module may be spitting bad info onto the HS-CAN causing all the error codes. Theory but only thing I could think of).I don't have 2011 schematics but looked at the 2010. 

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Miles on your Edge?  The easy things to do are to check the fuse (I am sure that is not it tho), and to pull the module and check all the pins and connector for dirt/grime/water/shorts etc.  Maybe all hope is not lost yet.

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Did you guys ever figure out what was causing this issue? My wife's 2011 edge just started doing the same thing and its driving me crazy. 

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Start by reprogramming the HVAC module. 

 

With the doors closed, press the climate control power button simultaneously with the defrost button. Hold for 10 - 20 seconds and release. Then press climate control power button one more time and the HVAC should reset. If it's a glitch, this should fix it. If not, I'd suspect the module itself.

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Hey Tyriq you gotta change your HVAC module....I had the same problem it fix now everything back to normal!!!

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On 5/10/2019 at 7:19 PM, TARiQ said:

I have a 2011 Ford Edge Limited. I'm having an electrical or computer problem which I can't seem to figure out. This may or may not have to do with the SYNC display, but that is where most things are noticeable, so that's what I'll be talking about. The interior cabin fan runs sporadically, turning off and on. The levels of blowing work fine. On the display itself, the clock and temp blink on and off. The ambient cabin lights blink on and off. So basically, the cabin ambient lighting, fans and clock all turn off and on. Everything else works. The radio and CD play fine. I can bluetooth to my phones and play music without a problem (at least no more of a problem than SYNC normally has). My navigation works fine. My air conditioning and heat both work, though the fan that blows them is the one that turns off and on. Also my temp within the cabin doesn't work, so I either have to set the temperature to LOW or HIGH to get any real change in temperature in the cabin. I'm not the most mechanically inclined, but hoping it's a simple thing like changing a fuse or something. More likely I'm thinking it's a bigger problem, but I have no idea what that would be (motherboard or something else?) and no idea how to diagnose it. Have others had this problem, as I can't seem to find it anywhere on Google? Any suggestions will be a big help

Few years late to this party, but our 2011 Edge (Limited) has been doing exactly this for a few months now.  After a visit to several scrap yards yesterday, I swapped (and re-programmed as-built data) the APIM module (three different times, with 3 different units I gathered from the scrap yards) without any positive results.  I had been damn sure this was going to solve the problem, but I was clearly wrong. I've watched battery voltage and all seems well...idles @ ~14.1 and dips to ~13.95 every time the blower kicks back on.  I'm at a loss.  One thing I'd really like to know is what/where this "HVAC module" that's referenced above is.  I've scoured the Google machine and can't find any solid answers...

 

Edited by wes8398

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10 hours ago, enigma-2 said:

Thanks for chiming in.  I have come across that post in my Googles a few times; but when I try to find the actual part to purchase, I keep coming up empty.  Same when I try to find a diagram/schematic locating a "heater control module", "ac control module", and all similar terms.  Nearest I've been able to find is the blower fan control switch.  *shrug*

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Could be wrong and may be model year dependent, but isn't the module part of the control panel? Switch panel?

 

Can't check today,  as in hospital. Maybe someone else will chime in.

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The following Climate Control System descriptions are  from the 2011 Edge Workshop Manual...

 

 

Dual-Zone Electronic Automatic Temperature Control (EATC)

The dual-zone Electronic Automatic Temperature Control (EATC) module analyzes input from the following sources:

  • Temperature, airflow mode, blower, A/C and RECIRC selection (made by the vehicle occupants)
  • In-vehicle temperature sensor
  • Ambient temperature sensor
  • Solar radiation sensor (sunload sensor)
  • Evaporator temperature sensor
  • Vehicle speed
  • Engine coolant temperature

Using these inputs, the dual-zone HVAC module determines the correct conditions for the following outputs:

  • A/C compressor operation
  • Blower speed
  • Temperature blend door position
  • Airflow mode door position
  • Air inlet door position

Control System Inputs

The dual-zone EATC system has 4 control system inputs.

 

HVAC Module

The EATC system uses a remote HVAC module that is separate from the control interface. The Front Controls Interface Module (FCIM) provides the interface for the vehicle occupants to control the climate control system. When selections are made, the FCIM communicates the selections to the HVAC module through the Medium Speed Controller Area Network (MS-CAN) , and the HVAC module adjusts the climate control system components to achieve the desired state. When the climate control system is operating in AUTO mode via command from the FCIM , the required climate control system settings are determined by the HVAC module. The HVAC module then adjusts the climate control system components to the desired state. The remote HVAC module is located under the driver side of the instrument panel.

 

In-Vehicle Temperature Sensor

The in-vehicle temperature sensor contains a thermistor which measures the in-vehicle air temperature and sends that reading to the HVAC module. An aspirator hose is connected between the heater core and evaporator core housing and the in-vehicle temperature sensor. The aspirator hose uses airflow through the heater core and evaporator core housing to create a venturi-type suction to draw in-vehicle air through the in-vehicle temperature sensor (across the thermistor).

 

Solar Radiation Sensor (Sunload Sensor)

The solar radiation sensor supplies information to the HVAC module indicating sunload.

 

Ambient Temperature Sensor

The ambient temperature sensor signal is received by the PCM and indicates the outside air temperature. The ambient temperature sensor is located in front of the radiator on the radiator support bolster.

 

Control System Outputs

The dual-zone EATC system has 4 control system outputs.

 

Blower Motor Speed Control

The blower motor speed control controls the blower motor speed by converting low power signals from the HVAC module to a high current, variable ground feed for the blower motor. A delay function provides a gradual increase or decrease in blower motor speed under all conditions.

 

Temperature Blend Door Actuators

The dual-zone EATC system uses 2 temperature blend door actuators to control 2 separate temperature blend doors. The temperature blend doors independently vary the LH and RH side temperature settings, as desired. The temperature blend door actuators each contain a reversible electric motor and a potentiometer. The potentiometer circuit consists of a 5-volt reference signal connected to one end of a variable resistor, and a signal ground connected to the other. A signal circuit is connected to a contact wiper, which is driven along the variable resistor by the actuator shaft. The signal to the HVAC module from the contact wiper indicates the position of the temperature blend door. The HVAC module drives the actuator motor in whichever direction is necessary to make the actuator contact wiper voltage agree with the expected HVAC module contact wiper voltage value.

 

Airflow Mode Door Actuator

The airflow mode door actuator uses a cam and lever assembly to position the airflow mode doors on command from the HVAC module. The airflow mode door actuator contains a reversible electric motor and potentiometer. The potentiometer allows the HVAC module to monitor the position of the airflow mode doors. The potentiometer circuit consists of a 5-volt reference signal connected to one end of a variable resistor, and a signal ground connected to the other. A signal circuit is connected to a contact wiper, which is driven along the variable resistor by the actuator shaft. The signal to the HVAC module from the contact wiper indicates the position of the airflow mode doors.

 

Air Inlet Mode Door Actuator

The air inlet mode door actuator moves the air inlet door between the fresh and RECIRC positions on command from the HVAC module. The air inlet mode door actuator is driven to, and automatically stops at, the full RECIRC or full fresh air inlet position and does not require a potentiometer circuit to monitor its position.

 

Climate Control System Network Communication

The controls for the climate control system are in one or more locations depending on vehicle option content.

  • Front Controls Interface Module (FCIM)
  • Instrument Panel Cluster (IPC) (if equipped with steering wheel controls, Dual Automatic Temperature Control (DATC) only)
  • Front Display Interface Module (FDIM) (if equipped with touchscreen controls, DATC only)

For DATC systems equipped with touchscreen or steering wheel controls, when the FDIM touchscreen or IPC steering wheel controls are used, they send a function request message over the Infotainment Controller Area Network (I-CAN) to the FCIM .

The FCIM reads the climate control selections and sends the requests to the HVAC module in the following message path:

  • The FCIM sends the requests over the I-CAN to the IPC module.
  • The IPC module then relays the requests to Body Control Module (BCM) over the High Speed Controller Area Network (HS-CAN) .
  • Lastly, the BCM then sends the requests to the HVAC module over the Medium Speed Controller Area Network (MS-CAN) .

For Electronic Manual Temperature Control (EMTC) systems, the messaging path is followed in reverse for any status updates that need to be sent from the HVAC module to the FCIM and Front Control/Display Interface Module (FCDIM) .

 

For DATC systems, the messaging path is followed in reverse for any status updates that need to be sent from the HVAC module to the FCIM , FCDIM (non-touchscreen), FDIM (touchscreen) and IPC message center.

 

Climate Control System Logic

 

Blower Motor Speed

When blower speed is selected, the FCIM sends the desired blower speed to the HVAC module using the message path described above. The HVAC module then commands the blower motor speed control to the desired speed. The HVAC module monitors the blower motor speed control feedback circuit to make sure the blower motor is at the desired speed.

 

Airflow Mode Selection

When an airflow mode is selected, the FCIM determines the applicable and allowable airflow direction. The FCIM then sends this desired airflow direction to the HVAC module using the message path described above. The HVAC module determines the actuator position that is required to deliver the correct airflow direction. While monitoring the defrost/panel/floor feedback circuit, the HVAC module drives the actuator until the feedback circuit indicates the actuator has reached its required position.

 

Temperature Selection

When a temperature is selected, the FCIM sends the desired temperature selection to the HVAC module using the message path described above. The HVAC module then determines the temperature blend door desired position. While monitoring the temperature blend door feedback circuit, the HVAC module drives the actuator until the feedback circuit indicates the actuator has reached its desired position.

 

Air Inlet Selection

When fresh air or RECIRC mode is selected, the FCIM sends the desired selection to the HVAC module using the message path described above. The HVAC module drives the air inlet mode door actuator until the HVAC module detects the actuator reached its end of travel. A spike in current draw tells the HVAC module the actuator has reached the end of its travel.

 

A/C Selection

When A/C is selected, the FCIM sends the selection to the HVAC module using the message path described above. If the ambient temperature is sufficient, the HVAC module then sends the request to the BCM over the MS-CAN . The BCM then sends the request to the PCM over the HS-CAN .

 

Field-Effect Transistor (FET) Protection

 

A Field-Effect Transistor (FET) is a type of transistor that, when used with module software, monitors and controls current flow on module outputs. The FET protection strategy prevents module damage in the event of excessive current flow.

 

The HVAC module utilizes an FET protective circuit strategy for its actuator outputs. Output load (current level) is monitored for excessive current (typically short circuits) and is shut down (turns off the voltage or ground provided by the module) when a fault event is detected. A short circuit DTC is stored at the fault event and a cumulative counter is started.

 

When the demand for the output is no longer present, the module resets the FET circuit protection to allow the circuit to function. The next time the driver requests a circuit to activate that has been shut down by a previous short (FET protection) and the circuit is still shorted, the FET protection shuts off the circuit again and the cumulative counter advances.

 

When the excessive circuit load occurs often enough, the module shuts down the output until a repair procedure is carried out. The FET protected circuit has 3 predefined levels of short circuit tolerance based on the harmful effect of each circuit fault on the FET and the ability of the FET to withstand it. A module lifetime level of fault events is established based upon the durability of the FET . If the total tolerance level is determined to be 600 fault events, the 3 predefined levels would be 200, 400 and 600 fault events.

 

When each tolerance level is reached, the short circuit DTC that was stored on the first failure cannot be cleared by a command to clear the DTCs. The module does not allow the DTC to be cleared or the circuit to be restored to normal operation until a successful self-test proves the fault has been repaired. After the self-test has successfully completed (no on-demand DTCs present), DTC U1000:00 and the associated DTC (the DTC related to the shorted circuit) automatically clears and the circuit function returns.

 

When each level is reached, the DTC associated with the short circuit sets along with DTC U1000:00. These DTCs can be cleared using the module self-test, then the Clear DTC operation on the scan tool. The module never resets the fault event counter to zero and continues to advance the fault event counter as short circuit fault events occur.

 

If the number of short circuit fault events reach the third level, then DTCs U1000:00 and U3000:49 set along with the associated short circuit DTC. DTC U3000:49 cannot be cleared and a new module must be installed after the repair.

 

 

The following are HVAC Module DTCs, which are indicative of the vehicle functions the HVAC Module influences, also from the 2011 Edge Workshop Manual...

 

 

HVAC Module DTC Chart

 

NOTE: This module utilizes a 5-character DTC followed by a 2-character failure-type code. The failure-type code provides information about specific fault conditions such as opens or shorts to ground. Continuous Memory Diagnostic Trouble Codes (CMDTCs) have an additional 2-character DTC status code suffix to assist in determining DTC history.

 

NOTE: Network DTCs (U-codes) are often a result of intermittent concerns such as damaged wiring or low battery voltage occurrences. Additionally, vehicle repair procedures such as module reprogramming often set network DTCs. Replacing a module to resolve a network DTC is unlikely to resolve the concern. To prevent repeat network DTC concerns, inspect all network wiring, especially connectors. Test the vehicle battery, refer to Section  414-01.

 

DTC Description Action to Take
B1034:11 Left Front Seat Heater Element: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  501-10.
B1034:13 Left Front Seat Heater Element: Circuit Open REFER to Section  501-10.
B1036:11 Right Front Seat Heater Element: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  501-10.
B1036:13 Right Front Seat Heater Element: Circuit Open REFER to Section  501-10.
B1038:11 Left Front Seat Heater Sensor: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  501-10.
B1038:12 Left Front Seat Heater Sensor: Circuit Short to Battery REFER to Section  501-10.
B103A:11 Right Front Seat Heater Sensor: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  501-10.
B103A:12 Right Front Seat Heater Sensor: Circuit Short to Battery REFER to Section  501-10.
B1081:07 Left Temperature Damper Motor: Mechanical Failure GO to Pinpoint Test O.
B1081:11 Left Temperature Damper Motor: Circuit Short to Ground GO to Pinpoint Test O.
B1081:12 Left Temperature Damper Motor: Circuit Short to Battery GO to Pinpoint Test O.
B1081:13 Left Temperature Damper Motor: Circuit Open GO to Pinpoint Test O.
B1082:07 Right Temperature Damper Motor: Mechanical Failure GO to Pinpoint Test P.
B1082:11 Right Temperature Damper Motor: Circuit Short to Ground GO to Pinpoint Test P.
B1082:12 Right Temperature Damper Motor: Circuit Short to Battery GO to Pinpoint Test P.
B1082:13 Right Temperature Damper Motor: Circuit open GO to Pinpoint Test P.
B1086:07 Air Distribution Damper Motor: Mechanical Failure GO to Pinpoint Test J.
B1086:11 Air Distribution Damper Motor: Circuit Short to Ground GO to Pinpoint Test J.
B1086:12 Air Distribution Damper Motor: Circuit Short to Battery GO to Pinpoint Test J.
B1086:13 Air Distribution Damper Motor: Circuit Open GO to Pinpoint Test J.
B10AF:12 Blower Fan Relay: Circuit Short to Battery GO to Pinpoint Test Q.
B10AF:13 Blower Fan Relay: Circuit Open GO to Pinpoint Test Q.
B10B9:12 Blower Control: Circuit Short to Battery GO to Pinpoint Test R.
B10B9:14 Blower Control: Circuit Short to Ground or Open GO to Pinpoint Test Q.
B11E5:11 Left HVAC Damper Position Sensor: Circuit Short to Ground GO to Pinpoint Test O.
B11E5:15 Left HVAC Damper Position Sensor: Circuit Short to Battery or Open GO to Pinpoint Test O.
B11E6:11 Right HVAC Damper Position Sensor: Circuit Short to Ground GO to Pinpoint Test P.
B11E6:15 Right HVAC Damper Position Sensor: Circuit Short to Battery or Open GO to Pinpoint Test P.
B11E7:11 Air Distribution Damper Position Sensor: Circuit Short to Ground GO to Pinpoint Test J.
B11E7:15 Air Distribution Damper Position Sensor: Circuit Short to Battery or Open GO to Pinpoint Test J.
B127B:11 Ambient Lighting Zone 1 Output Red LED: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  417-02.
B127B:13 Ambient Lighting Zone 1 Output Red LED: Circuit Open REFER to Section  417-02.
B127C:11 Ambient Lighting Zone 2 Output Red LED: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  417-02.
B127C:13 Ambient Lighting Zone 2 Output Red LED: Circuit Open REFER to Section  417-02.
B127D:11 Ambient Lighting Zone 3 Output Red LED: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  417-02.
B127D:13 Ambient Lighting Zone 3 Output Red LED: Circuit Open REFER to Section  417-02.
B127E:11 Ambient Lighting Zone 1 Output Green LED: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  417-02.
B127E:13 Ambient Lighting Zone 1 Output Green LED: Circuit Open REFER to Section  417-02.
B127F:11 Ambient Lighting Zone 2 Output Green LED: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  417-02.
B127F:13 Ambient Lighting Zone 2 Output Green LED: Circuit Open REFER to Section  417-02.
B1280:11 Ambient Lighting Zone 3 Output Green LED: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  417-02.
B1280:13 Ambient Lighting Zone 3 Output Green LED: Circuit Open REFER to Section  417-02.
B1281:11 Ambient Lighting Zone 1 Output Blue LED: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  417-02.
B1281:13 Ambient Lighting Zone 1 Output Blue LED: Circuit Open REFER to Section  417-02.
B1282:11 Ambient Lighting Zone 2 Output Blue LED: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  417-02.
B1282:12 Ambient Lighting Zone 2 Output Blue LED: Circuit Short to Battery REFER to Section  417-02.
B1283:11 Ambient Lighting Zone 3 Output Blue LED: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  417-02.
B1283:13 Ambient Lighting Zone 3 Output Blue LED: Circuit Open REFER to Section  417-02.
B12F1:11 Ambient Lighting Zone 1 Output : Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  417-02.
B12F1:13 Ambient Lighting Zone 1 Output : Circuit Open REFER to Section  417-02.
B12F2:11 Ambient Lighting Zone 2 Output : Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  417-02.
B12F2:13 Ambient Lighting Zone 2 Output : Circuit Open REFER to Section  417-02.
B1321:11 Ambient Lighting Zone 3 Output: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  417-02.
B1321:13 Ambient Lighting Zone 3 Output: Circuit Open REFER to Section  417-02.
B1A61:11 Cabin Temperature Sensor: Circuit Short to Ground GO to Pinpoint Test D.
B1A61:15 Cabin Temperature Sensor: Circuit Short to Battery or Open If only DTC B1A61:15 is set, GO to Pinpoint Test D.

 

If DTC B1A61:15, B1A63:15 and B1A64:15 all set, GO to Pinpoint Test T.
B1A63:11 Right Solar Sensor: Circuit Short to Ground GO to Pinpoint Test E.
B1A63:15 Right Solar Sensor: Circuit Short to Battery or Open If only DTC B1A63:15 is set, GO to Pinpoint Test E.

 

If DTC B1A61:15, B1A63:15 and B1A64:15 all set, GO to Pinpoint Test T.
B1A64:11 Left Solar Sensor: Circuit Short to Ground GO to Pinpoint Test E.
B1A64:15 Left Solar Sensor: Circuit Short to Battery or Open If only DTC B1A64:15 is set, GO to Pinpoint Test E.

 

If DTC B1A61:15, B1A63:15 and B1A64:15 all set, GO to Pinpoint Test T.
B1B71:11 Evaporator Temperature Sensor: Circuit Short to Ground GO to Pinpoint Test F.
B1B71:15 Evaporator Temperature Sensor: Circuit Short to Battery or Open GO to Pinpoint Test F.
B1C83:11 Rear Defog Relay: Circuit Short to Ground REFER to Section  501-11.
B1C83:13 Rear Defog Relay: Circuit Open REFER to Section  501-11.
C1B14:11 Sensor Supply Voltage A: Circuit Short to Ground GO to Pinpoint Test C.
C1B14:12 Sensor Supply Voltage A: Circuit Short to Battery GO to Pinpoint Test C.
U0140:00 Lost Communication With Body Control Module: No Sub Type Information GO to Pinpoint Test S.
U0401:09 Invalid Data Received From ECM/PCM A: Component Failure This DTC can set due to a fault in the PCM. CARRY OUT a self-test of the PCM and DIAGNOSE any PCM DTCs present, REFER to Section  303-14.
U0401:68 Invalid Data Received From ECM/PCM A: Event Information This DTC can set due to a fault in the PCM. CARRY OUT a self-test of the PCM and DIAGNOSE any PCM DTCs present, REFER to Section  303-14.
U0401:81 Invalid Data Received From ECM/PCM A: Invalid Serial Data Received This DTC can set due to a fault in the PCM. CARRY OUT a self-test of the PCM and DIAGNOSE any PCM DTCs present, REFER to Section  303-14.
U0401:82 Invalid Data Received From ECM/PCM A: Alive/Sequence Counter Incorrect/Not Updates This DTC can set due to a fault in the PCM. CARRY OUT a self-test of the PCM and DIAGNOSE any PCM DTCs present, REFER to Section  303-14.
U0422:68 Invalid Data Received From Body Control Module: Event Information This DTC can set due to a fault in the Body Control Module (BCM) . CARRY OUT a self-test of the BCM and DIAGNOSE any BCM DTCs present, REFER to Section  419-10.
U0422:81 Invalid Data Received From Body Control Module: Invalid Serial Data Received This DTC can set due to a fault in the Body Control Module (BCM) . CARRY OUT a self-test of the BCM and DIAGNOSE any BCM DTCs present, REFER to Section  419-10.
U0423:82 Invalid Data Received From Instrument Panel Cluster Control Module: Alive/Sequence Counter Incorrect/Not Updates This DTC can set due to a fault in the Instrument Panel Cluster (IPC) . CARRY OUT a self-test of the IPC and DIAGNOSE any IPC DTCs present, REFER to Section  413-01.
U0554:82 Invalid Data Received From Accessory Protocol Interface Module: Alive/Sequence Counter Incorrect/Not Updates This DTC can set due to a fault in the Accessory Protocol Interface Module (APIM) . CARRY OUT a self-test of the APIM and DIAGNOSE any APIM DTCs present, REFER to Section  415-00.
U1000:00 Solid State Driver Protection Activated — Driver Disabled: No Sub Type Information The HVAC module has temporarily disabled an output because an excessive current draw exists (such as a short to ground). The HVAC module cannot enable the output until the cause of the short is corrected. ADDRESS all other DTCs first. After the cause of the concern is corrected, CLEAR the DTCs. REPEAT the self-test.
U2024:51 Control Module Cal-Config Data: Not Programmed CARRY OUT Programmable Module Installation (PMI) on the HVAC module. REFER to Section  418-01. REPEAT the self-test. If PMI is successful, the DTC will not be present. If the DTC returns, INSTALL a new HVAC module. REFER to Section  412-01. TEST the system for normal operation.
U2100:00 Initial Configuration Not Complete: No Sub Type Information CARRY OUT Programmable Module Installation (PMI) on the HVAC module. REFER to Section  418-01. REPEAT the self-test. If PMI is successful, the DTC will not be present. If the DTC returns, INSTALL a new HVAC module. REFER to Section  412-01. TEST the system for normal operation.
U3000:41 Control Module: General Checksum Failure INSTALL a new HVAC module. REFER to Section  412-01. TEST the system for normal operation.
U3000:49 Control Module: Internal Electronic Failure The module has permanently disabled an output because an excessive current draw fault (such as a short to ground) has exceeded the limits that the HVAC module can withstand. The cause of the excessive current draw MUST be corrected before a new HVAC module is installed. ADDRESS all other DTCs first. After the cause of the concern is corrected, INSTALL a new HVAC module. REFER to Section  412-01. TEST the system for normal operation.
U3002:62 Vehicle Identification Number: Signal Compare Failure CARRY OUT Programmable Module Installation (PMI) on the HVAC module. REFER to Section  418-01. REPEAT the self-test. If PMI is successful, the DTC will not be present. If the DTC returns, INSTALL a new HVAC module. REFER to Section  412-01. TEST the system for normal operation.
U3003:16 Battery Voltage: Circuit Voltage Below Threshold GO to Pinpoint Test G.
U3003:17 Battery Voltage: Circuit Voltage Above Threshold GO to Pinpoint Test G.

 

 

So. while various DTCs refer to specific Pinpoint diagnostic routines,  the symptom of Blower Motor Does Not Operate Correctly indicates Pinpoint Test R, for which PDF download links of the diagnostic procedure and associated Workshop Manual selections are included below, along with images of wiring diagrams, connector location diagrams, and a FordParts online listing for the HVAC Module part # 19980.

 

Good luck!

 

Dual ATC Climate Control Wiring Diagram Page 1 - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.jpg

 

 

Dual ATC Climate Control Wiring Diagram Page 2 - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.jpg

 

 

Dual ATC Climate Control Wiring Diagram Page 3 - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.jpg

 

 

Dual ATC Climate Control Wiring Diagram Page 4 - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.jpg

 

 

Dual ATC Climate Control Wiring Diagram Page 5 - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.jpg

 

 

HVAC Module Connector C228A Location Diagram - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.jpg

 

 

Blower Motor Speed Control Connector C271 Location Diagram - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.jpg

 

 

FordParts Online Listing - HVAC Module Part Number 19980.jpg

 

Pinpoint Test R - The Blower Motor Does Not Operate Correctly - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.pdf

HVAC Module Connector C228A Wiring-Circuit Legend - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.pdf

Blower Motor Speed Control Connector C271 Wiring-Circuit Legend - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.pdf

Instrument Panel Exploded View - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.pdf

Blower Motor Speed Control Removal and Installation - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.pdf

HVAC Module Removal and Installation - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.pdf

Module Configuration Parameters Includes HVAC Module - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.pdf

Edited by Haz
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On 4/29/2022 at 4:50 PM, Haz said:

The following Climate Control System descriptions are  from the 2011 Edge Workshop Manual...

 

On 4/29/2022 at 10:03 AM, enigma-2 said:

Could be wrong and may be model year dependent, but isn't the module part of the control panel? Switch panel?

 

Can't check today,  as in hospital. Maybe someone else will chime in.

 

I didn't get notified of the responses here... glad I happened to check in!! 

 

After replacing the APIM a number of times, as well as just replacing the blower motor resistor, my next go is this mysterious hvac control module (which I've come to find out is also called the "dash control unit").  I starting checking things out briefly tonight, and it looks like there's going to be some serious trim removal going on.  I wasn't much looking forward to winging all that on my own; but Haz just KILLED IT with that info dump has absolutely made my night.  I'm about to delve into some of it now.  Thanks SO MUCH, Haz!!

Edited by 1004ron
Really no need to quote everything including all images
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Please let me know if anyone got this fixed and how you did it. I am having same problem. Thanks in advance. 

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On 5/18/2022 at 2:11 PM, Shera said:

Please let me know if anyone got this fixed and how you did it. I am having same problem. Thanks in advance. 

Keep in mind that, beside the control module, it could also be a defective motor, relay or speed control assy. Pulling the codes is a first step in isolating where to start.

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On 5/18/2022 at 2:11 PM, Shera said:

Please let me know if anyone got this fixed and how you did it. I am having same problem. Thanks in advance. 

I'm going to be working on it again soon, and plan to report back. Just need to get to a scrap yard and find a replacement hvac module (or two) to swap in.  Hoping I can grab it from a u-pick yard so I can learn how to access it while I'm digging it out.  That gift posted above is absolute gold though. 

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The following Exploded View illustrations are from the 2011 Edge Workshop Manual...

 

Good luck!

 

Climate Control System Components - HVAC Module - Exploded View - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.jpg

 

Climate Control System Components - Heater Core and Evaporator Core Housing - Exploded View - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.jpg

 

Climate Control System Components - In-Vehicle Temperature Sensor - Exploded View - 2011 Edge Workshop Manual.jpg

 

Edited by Haz
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2 hours ago, Haz said:

The following Exploded View illustrations are from the 2011 Edge Workshop Manual...

 

Good luck!

 

 

 

Man, you're awesome!! Are these by any chance publicly available to search out myself?  

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6 hours ago, Haz said:

The following Exploded View illustrations are from the 2011 Edge Workshop Manual...

 

Good luck!

 

 

 

Also... now that I'm looking at parts/options... do you happen to know if I *have* to get the exact matching part number, including the suffix letter which seems to discern options like with or without ambient lighting, dual zone climate, heated seats, etc...? 

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UPDATE: PROBLEM SOLVED!! (thanks to a few regulars here who seem to find the time to contribute to EVERYthing)

I went to a scrap yard that had a handful of 1st gen Edges in their yard last week, and managed to grab 4 different HVAC modules (along with some replacement rear parking sensors) for $75. Picture 3 is of the faulty original unit that was replaced with one of a different part #, but luckily fully compatible with all the options in my Limited (ambient lighting, automatic hvac control, dual climate control, heated seats, etc).  *Note in picture 4 that 2 of the modules I retrieved were missing a receptacle.  This was likely due to those vehicles not being equipped with certain options (heated seats? ambient lighting?)* 
After having the opportunity to tear into the scrap yard vehicles without any regard for their well-being, I devised myself a plan to easily replace the module.  The first step of the process was to remove the side access panel to the dash/door vent.  After opening that up, as you can see in the pic below, I used an angle grinder to cut a little access hole in the "blank" of the dash piece that lays UNDER the removeable kick panel.  From these two access points, I was able to remove the plastic push-rivet that holds the vent tube to the module frame/mount; and then remove the upper portion of the vent tube entirely.   After that, it's a matter of one retaining screw, and then unplugging the connectors from the module to drop it out and swap.  With everything back together, you'd have no clue I was ever in there.  Now the fan, lighting, etc... everything... works perfectly.  No programming needed, either! 

 

 

 

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