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EDST777

Why is only 6 liters of cooling liquid drained from 11 at a time?

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 Hi. Today I tried to change cooling liquid from VC-7-B Gold for Green VC-10-A2. There was a problem by unscrewing a plastic plug at the bottom of the radiator cooling the glass liquid into the tray, but its volume turned out to be about 6 liters. I did six times washing with distilled water (6 * 6 liters of distilled water). I have a question: why I can not drain 11 liters, as indicated in the manual, liquid remains in the system. Any thoughts.
P.s: Now I poured distilled water till morning to continue the replacement.

 Why is only 6 liters of cooling liquid drained from 11 at a time?
Can I start the engine briefly for a few seconds to drain the remaining cooling liquid from the cylinder blocks jacket?
I think the remaining 4 liters are in the engine between the pump and the thermostat and therefore there is this problem that they need to be removed either to start the engine or to use the replacement device in a special service, but this service is not everywhere.I think that more often the dealer (this I read in neighboring topics) makes a replacement twice, it looks like a way to partially replace.

  And there's a problem pouring concentrate, if I don't get the 4 remaining liters, then to get a 50/50 mixture I need to mix 5.5 liters of concentrate with 1.5 liters of distilled water, because 4 liters are in the engine. Who will support my thoughts?)

  Any thoughts you have...

Edited by EDST777

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because you have a thermostat in between.

 

so coolant stays in engine block and you get about 1/2 of total capacity out with each drain/fill with thermostat in place.

 

top up the fluid with new 50/50 or premixedfluid, drive the vehicle or leave it running with cabin heat on for 30 minutes to completely mix the old/new fluids.  Repeat drain/fills 3 more times. done.

Edited by WWWPerfA_ZN0W
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Make certain you get all the gold out (doesn't play well with others). You may also need to change the water pump inlet tube (if car built before certain date).  See atrached: 

2009 MKX Cooling System Corrosion.pdf

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Thank you for your information. It is as always, very valuable and full, it helps in the highest degree.
I finished the replacement yesterday, it took me two times 6-7 hours. I do not have very convenient conditions for replacement, this increases the process, but in any case there is a waiting time for the engine to work and this cannot be shortened. This is a rather tedious process, because it is stretched in time and requires multiple discharge filling of the washing solution and further distilled water for repeated washing. I did washing twice and after that I made a water change eight times since half always stays in the engine. At the end, I got a clean water, almost odorless, with a minimum of sludge, but all the time a small amount of sand and sediments came out. At the end, I added 5 liters of concentrate, which poured into the expansion tank, started the engine and they mixed with six liters of water that remained inside. Total my mixed solution is now 11 liters.

  Now my concentration of coolant solution is 45 VC10A2: 55 water. Later, I plan to increase the concentration to 50:50. Perhaps my post will be useful for those who independently decide to make a replacement.

 My thoughts are that when replaced by a device in specialized services there will be no such effect, because sludge, precipitation, sand are collected at the bottom of the radiator and they cannot be removed from the system.
If you make a replacement through a plug from below the radiator, then all the contaminants merge by gravity, but this is very long, the choice of the replacement method is yours. This is one of the ways).

Edited by EDST777

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11 hours ago, enigma-2 said:

Make certain you get all the gold out (doesn't play well with others). You may also need to change the water pump inlet tube (if car built before certain date).  See atrached: 

2009 MKX Cooling System Corrosion.pdf

Thank you for your information. It is as always, very valuable and full, it helps in the highest degree.

Thank you for your help, I did a double wash with a special agent like Kuhler-Reiniger 0.3l LIQUI MOLY and then I washed eight times with distilled water, but I did not change "the water pump inlet tube," it requires removal of the inlet path, which can take a whole day, besides I am not sure that now for me
Is this recommendation made due to the fact that for many this pipe is heated and begins to flow? Do I get it right? Thank you, any thoughts you have...

  p.s.:       I want to understand why I need to replace the tube, now I have studied the manual and the Internet resources, they say that this tube is metal. So its damage is difficult, rather as I read on some reports owners there is wear of silicone seals at the beginning and end of the tube, these seals are orange in color in the photo. I read that the owners are limited to replacing silicone o-rings. If you have other information or have other thoughts please share them here in this post, I would be very grateful to everyone. Replace the rings it is more economical and accessible to me than the whole tube.
Once again, any thoughts you may have on all of the issues outlined above. Thank you.

Трубка охлажд. жидкости металлическая Ford 7T4Z8A505CA

Edited by EDST777

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anything can be damaged, plastic, metal, rubber, etc.  the problem was the coating they used in the early gen 1 vehicles on the inside of the crossover tube.  it did not work well with the OEM Gold coolant, and would flake off and clog the heater core. so Ford went to Specialty Green recommendation instead of Gold if there was a heater core problem, plus changing the damaged crossover tube.

 

if you have no heat issues and  the temperature is even at all outlets, you don't have to worry about the crossover tube.  my 07 has not had a problem so far (now i have jinxed it lol). 

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17 minutes ago, WWWPerfA_ZN0W said:

anything can be damaged, plastic, metal, rubber, etc.  the problem was the coating they used in the early gen 1 vehicles on the inside of the crossover tube.  it did not work well with the OEM Gold coolant, and would flake off and clog the heater core. so Ford went to Specialty Green recommendation instead of Gold if there was a heater core problem, plus changing the damaged crossover tube.

 

if you have no heat issues and  the temperature is even at all outlets, you don't have to worry about the crossover tube.  my 07 has not had a problem so far (now i have jinxed it lol). 

 

Thanks for the explanation, I will measure the temperature difference.

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Hi, after measuring with a pyrometer, the temperature difference is 8-9 degrees Celsius, I think for now, leave everything as it is. This method of analyzing damage to the pump supply pipe is based on an indirect judgment of the contamination of the interior heater radiator, they carry out a correlation: if the interior radiator is contaminated, the pipe will also be damaged, please comment on this. That is, this is not an entirely obvious method, for example, the stove may contain a small amount of precipitation, sludge, and the tube will be quite working, because its diameter is much larger. Am I right or wrong? Any thoughts please ....

Edited by EDST777

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