Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Edge Guide

2011 Ford Edge Debuts 2.0L Turbo Eco Boost

Recommended Posts

2011 Ford Edge Debuts 2.0L Turbo Eco Boost

 

• Ford’s EcoBoost™ engine technology, featuring turbocharging with direct injection, will migrate to the popular Ford Edge crossover

• The 2.0-liter EcoBoost I-4 will deliver class-leading power and torque for a four-cylinder engine and best-in-class fuel economy with improvements of at least 10 percent versus comparable V-6 engines

* The Ford Edge with EcoBoost will have a 2.0-liter I-4 engine with a single turbocharger as well as a host of clever control strategies to maximize horsepower, torque and fuel economy

• By 2013, 90 percent of Ford’s vehicles in North America will be available with EcoBoost, with I-4 engines making up 66 percent of the EcoBoost lineup

 

Ford Edge Forum – Ford’s groundbreaking EcoBoost engine technology, which customers have embraced since its introduction a year ago, will soon be available on the Ford Edge. Powered by a 2.0-liter I-4 engine with direct fuel injection and a single turbocharger, the Ford Edge with EcoBoost will deliver the same performance feel as a current V-6 while delivering best-in-class fuel economy.

 

“Customers have embraced EcoBoost technology because of its ability to deliver power and performance with uncompromised fuel economy,” said Derrick Kuzak, group vice president of global product development. “We’re committed to delivering this technology to multiple vehicles so that more and more customers can take advantage of EcoBoost’s unique, no-compromise combination of power, performance and fuel economy. The EcoBoost strategy works in any gasoline engine, so it’s only natural to now add a four-cylinder EcoBoost engine to complement our EcoBoost V-6 lineup, which is delivering outstanding results and customer satisfaction.”

 

With Edge’s 2.0-liter EcoBoost, the fuel economy benefits will be at least 10 percent better than a comparable V-6 but with class-leading power and torque for an I-4.

 

Since being introduced in 2009 on four vehicles – the Ford Taurus SHO (standard) and Lincoln MKS full-size sedans and the Ford Flex and Lincoln MKT crossovers – EcoBoost engines have been embraced by customers. The Ford Taurus SHO has a conquest rate of 45 percent, and since launch, in terms of volume, 48 percent of Lincoln MKT sales are with the EcoBoost option. Altogether, nearly 6,000 EcoBoost-equipped vehicles have been sold since introduction.

 

“EcoBoost technology is helping bring in a new customer to Ford and Lincoln Mercury dealer showrooms,” said Amy Marentic, Ford group marketing manager. “This customer is younger, more affluent, and more often trades in competitive products.”

 

The addition of an I-4 EcoBoost to Ford’s lineup is a strong answer to consumer demand for engines of this size, which began in 2008. Approximately one-third of Ford’s U.S. engine volume is I-4 as customers focus more on fuel economy and lower emissions. EcoBoost engines help deliver performance on both fronts, cutting CO2 emissions by up to 15 percent compared with larger-displacement engines with similar power.

 

Overall, the 2.0-liter EcoBoost I-4 engine is about 55 pounds lighter than a comparable normally aspirated 3.5-liter V-6 engine. The 2.0-liter EcoBoost I-4 also will benefit from a six-speed transmission specially calibrated to take advantage of the EcoBoost. The gearbox features a new torque converter for improved driving feel, silky smooth shifts and excellent fuel economy. Engineers also installed revised gear ratios for a balanced driving feel in all situations. The new ratios complement the revised torque converter.

 

First global EcoBoost solution

The 2.0-liter EcoBoost I-4 is the first engine in the EcoBoost lineup to go truly global. Already announced is the 2.0-liter EcoBoost in the S-MAX and Galaxy, two people-moving products on sale in Europe. In addition, the same engine will join the powertrain lineup for the 2011 Ford Falcon on sale in Australia. Later in the year, the second application for North America will be announced, demonstrating how this technology is quickly migrating around the world as customers look for the perfect balance of horsepower with fuel economy.

 

Building on proven strategies with new solutions

The 2.0-liter EcoBoost I-4 engine employs many of the basic principles of Ford’s original 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 engines, starting with turbocharging and direct fuel injection. The turbocharger increases airflow in the engine to boost power and direct injection helps enable more efficient fuel burn for better fuel economy. Just like the first-generation EcoBoost engines, the EcoBoost I-4 will spool up quickly to maximum torque and maintain it across a broad range – estimated from 2,000 rpm to 5,500 rpm, according to preliminary Ford data.

 

The turbocharger recovers energy from the exhaust that otherwise would be wasted and puts it back in the engine to gain efficiency. Simply, the turbocharging system puts more air into the engine, creating more power. A compressor increases or boosts the pressure of the air entering the engine. An air-to-air intercooler reduces the air temperature before it enters the engine.

 

The 2.0-liter EcoBoost I-4 engine also adds Ti-VCT (Twin Independent Variable Camshaft Timing) technology to the recipe for success. This strategy, because of its efficiency, is incorporated into several normally aspirated (non-boosted) engine programs that debut this year, including the Ford Edge, Ford Mustang and Lincoln MKX.

 

A closer look at Ti-VCT technology

 

What it is: Ti-VCT technology creates precise, variable timing control of both the intake and exhaust camshafts, which control the valve opening and closing events. Each of the two camshafts is controlled independently. Ti-VCT uses the intake camshaft phasing to advance the intake valve opening and closing events and the exhaust camshaft phasing to retard the exhaust valve events from their base “engine off” positions.

 

How it helps: The ability to vary the overlap between the intake and exhaust valves helps eliminate compromises in the two processes: fresh charge induction and exhaust gas discharge. The result is greater efficiency through reduced gas exchange pumping work, which leads to better fuel economy – approximately a 3 to 4 percent improvement from this strategy alone compared with non-VCT engines. Another benefit of Ti-VCT technology is a broadened torque curve. Because the Ti-VCT strategy allows the intake valve to be advanced, instant power is delivered when the customer demands it at low speeds. At high speeds, the intake cam is retarded and higher airflows are available, which results in approximately a 10 percent power improvement over non-VCT engines.

 

Re-engineering the combustion system

The combustion system has been completely redesigned and re-engineered to take advantage of the EcoBoost system’s increased performance. The high-pressure fuel pump operates up to 2,200 psi – more than 50 times the norm seen in a conventional I-4 engine. The high-pressure pump is a cam-driven mechanical pump with a single piston and an electronic valve that controls how much fuel is routed into the fuel rail to the injectors.

 

As demands on the turbocharged 2.0-liter EcoBoost I-4 engine are increased, the control system responds to maintain optimal combustion, timing and injection duration.

 

On each stroke, six individual jets on each fuel injector spray fuel directly into the combustion chamber, mixing with the incoming air. By bringing the fuel injector right into the combustion chamber, there’s no delay from the time the fuel is injected to when it’s used by the engine.

 

The fuel injectors are located on the side of the combustion chamber. When the fuel is injected into the cylinder, it evaporates and cools the air that’s been inducted into the cylinder.

 

“Another benefit of our direct-injection method is that it cools the air right where you’re going to burn it,” said Olaf Kunde, powertrain systems manager. “This action both improves the breathing of the engine and minimizes knocking.”

 

The improved charge cooling allows the direct-injected turbocharged engine to run a higher compression ratio than was possible on port fuel-injected boosted engines. That higher compression ratio equates to improved fuel economy across the operating range of the engine.

 

The direct injection of fuel into the cylinder also helps provide a well-mixed air-fuel charge, increasing engine efficiency. Direct injection provides several benefits in terms of fuel burn and lower emissions.

 

“Because the fuel is directly introduced into the combustion chamber, you don’t get fuel wetting the combustion wall like with port fuel injection, you don’t saturate the ports and you don’t get droplets that might recombine and add to saturation,” said Kunde. “By injecting fuel directly into the combustion chamber and under high pressure, the fuel can be directed to exactly where we want it to be for a given combustion cycle.”

 

The spray pattern for the fuel was optimized after extensive computer modeling work, with the angle of how the fuel is sprayed key to the process.

 

“The better combustion process is a big advantage of direct injection,” said Kunde. “In a port fuel system, at key off it’s possible to have fuel on the walls of the intake port, which migrates to the top of the valve and puddles. So when you key on, you get that emissions spike. Direct injection is much cleaner from that standpoint. This same feature also greatly reduces the evaporative emissions from the vehicle.”

 

Turbo lag virtually eliminated

The turbocharger operation paired with the direct-injection system helps to virtually eliminate turbo lag. The turbocharger spins at up to 200,000 rpm and is designed for a life cycle of 150,000 miles or 10 years.

 

“Our testing is far, far more harsh than could be achieved in the real world,” said Kunde. “In an extreme situation, a customer might be able to hit peak power for about 10 seconds – probably not even that much. We test at peak power for hundreds of hours to ensure we can reach our durability and reliability goals.”

 

The turbocharger is about the size of a grapefruit, helping to provide a big performance advantage to customers. Kunde describes the torque response in terms of linear acceleration – power whenever the customer wants it.

 

“You get peak torque across a very wide engine speed range,” he said. “It’s available when you pull away from a stoplight or pass someone on a secondary road at a comparatively low speed. You don’t need to wind up the engine to get performance out of it. It’s there all the time.”

 

Turbocharger “whoosh” is mitigated by electronically controlled anti-surge valves that proactively relieve the boost in the intake, which can range up to 13 psi. Careful software calibrations manage the pressures in the intake manifold.

 

“We control the boost to make sure that customers don’t recognize when the boost is building,” said Kunde. “As the turbocharger spools up, the electronic control system takes over. Our active wastegate control, along with the throttle, controls the boost and torque levels very precisely, and the customer perceives a continuous delivery of torque.”

 

Extensive durability tests ensure the 2.0-liter EcoBoost I-4 will excel in all conditions. Start-up tests, with a wide variety of fuels, were made in conditions ranging from minus 40 degrees to 110 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

“The direct-injection fuel system allows us some real opportunities in terms of optimizing cold start for both emissions and robustness,” said Kunde. “We have multiple injections for each combustion event, and we can essentially tune where those injections should take place to deliver the strongest start possible with the lowest emissions, which is great news for customers.”

 

Need more Ford Eco Boost info.? Check out the Ford Eco Boost Forum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you guys think the 2.0 ecoboost will come in 4wd?

 

If i remember correctly a few years back the escape came with a Zetec from the focus and was 4wd.

Edited by ZX3_2NV

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah ... I would say that they will have this with the option of 4 wheel or 2 wheel front like they do now ... to save on cost.

 

-Ray-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sure hope it comes with All-wheel drive.

 

Do you think the 2.0 Turbo will be available at the time of 2011 Edge introduction this summer or will that engine come later ?

 

The reason I ask is that Ford's web pages on the 2011 Edge --

http://www.fordvehicles.com/crossovers/edge/2011/features/#page=FeatureCategory1

only mention the 3.5 and 3.7 litre V6 engines.

 

I have a 2009 Audi TT w/ 2.0L Turbo and am a big fan of that engine. I get ~33 mpg highway (~28 mpg on average in mixed driving) and it's rated at 6.1 secs. for 0-60.

 

I know the Edge won't have the same performance or mileage levels as such a small car as the TT, but this engine still sounds like the combination of mileage and performance I'd be happy with in this size SUV.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fingers crossed it will be available by summer.I too like the idea of a smaller engine.Hopefully with the smaller engine it might get 30 highway miles per gallon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The EB 2.0 is late availability - could mean a month after it debuts or 6 months. Haven't heard anyone specify a timeframe yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All this info and nothing on HP or Torque? Any ideas yet?

 

All they've said so far is "more than the 3.0L V6" which would put it around 250.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

EcoBoost, TWINFORCE = horribly poor FE 99% of the time in return for STELLAR 0-60 times.

 

Turbo lag is lowered by exhausting some of the energy of combustion into the exhaust manifold to spool the turbine up more quickly. Eliminate the turbo and raise the compression ratio to a level cognizant with DFI, ~12:1, and get good FE 99% of the time.

 

Even better....

 

Adopt Toyota's new e/VVT-i technique to shift the engine mode between Otto mode and Atkinson mode. ~15:1 CR for low to moderate throttle openings but ~12:1 (DFI) for WOT.

 

Or even better...

 

West/Otto/Atkinson/Miller multi-mode engine using e/VVT-i along with a variable volume (Toyota's HSD CVT/PSD) positive displacement SuperCharger to eliminate the throttle plate and provide BOOST ONLY at WOT.

 

West/Otto/Atkinson/Miller Multimode....15:1 CR (Otto) >>> 15:1 CR (Atkinson, 13:1 effective) >>>/10:1 CR (Miller, 15-18:1 effective {full BOOST}).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

EcoBoost, TWINFORCE = horribly poor FE 99% of the time in return for STELLAR 0-60 times.

 

Turbo lag is lowered by exhausting some of the energy of combustion into the exhaust manifold to spool the turbine up more quickly. Eliminate the turbo and raise the compression ratio to a level cognizant with DFI, ~12:1, and get good FE 99% of the time.

 

Even better....

 

Adopt Toyota's new e/VVT-i technique to shift the engine mode between Otto mode and Atkinson mode. ~15:1 CR for low to moderate throttle openings but ~12:1 (DFI) for WOT.

 

Or even better...

 

West/Otto/Atkinson/Miller multi-mode engine using e/VVT-i along with a variable volume (Toyota's HSD CVT/PSD) positive displacement SuperCharger to eliminate the throttle plate and provide BOOST ONLY at WOT.

 

West/Otto/Atkinson/Miller Multimode....15:1 CR (Otto) >>> 15:1 CR (Atkinson, 13:1 effective) >>>/10:1 CR (Miller, 15-18:1 effective {full BOOST}).

 

OK, sounds good, and your point is ......? :baby:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, sounds good, and your point is ......? :baby:

 

He doesn't have any valid points, just lunatic rants. He hates ecoboost technology, thinks it's safer to use summer tires in the dead of winter and thinks a FWD based AWD vehicle is a patently unsafe deathtrap. Just ignore him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, sounds good, and your point is ......? :baby:

 

wwest is a cancer that is all over the internets. It's best to avoid his posts, they're nonsense.

 

I can't wait to testdrive this new EcoBoost engine. I love turbos and I LOVE turbos with low end torque. The only problem here would be in city MPG, it'll vary a lot and I can forsee the complaints already

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wwest is a cancer that is all over the internets. It's best to avoid his posts, they're nonsense.

 

I can't wait to testdrive this new EcoBoost engine. I love turbos and I LOVE turbos with low end torque. The only problem here would be in city MPG, it'll vary a lot and I can forsee the complaints already

the 2.0 Ecoboost in the Explorer requires premium. 237 hp, 250 fp. It is also an extra cost option and is not available with awd. If this holds true for the Edge, the much improved 3.5 may be the most cost efficient choice in actual use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the 2.0 Ecoboost in the Explorer requires premium.

 

Says who?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Says who?

Ford. It is on the 2011 Explorer web site. The list of features shows the 2.0L with that specification

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ford. It is on the 2011 Explorer web site. The list of features shows the 2.0L with that specification

 

That doesn't mean it requires premium. It means those power figures were obtained using Premium. I'm sure it will run just fine on regular just like the 3.5L EB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That doesn't mean it requires premium. It means those power figures were obtained using Premium. I'm sure it will run just fine on regular just like the 3.5L EB.

Not always true, but you are probably correct. I have watched your posts and know that you are a reliable and helpful contributor. Regular can significantly reduce mileage in an engine tuned for premium. My 1.8 turbo Passat was down 5 to 10% if regular was used. 5% is typical in testing I saw a few years ago (can't recall the source). I'm not knocking the 2.0. It is my preference. But if the option price is more than $500., or so, it may not make sense. The 185 hp 3.5 gets great mileage for '11 and is smooth with a sporty exhaust note. It is possible to build a fairly smooth 2 liter 4. I'm hoping Ford got it right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not always true, but you are probably correct. I have watched your posts and know that you are a reliable and helpful contributor. Regular can significantly reduce mileage in an engine tuned for premium. My 1.8 turbo Passat was down 5 to 10% if regular was used. 5% is typical in testing I saw a few years ago (can't recall the source). I'm not knocking the 2.0. It is my preference. But if the option price is more than $500., or so, it may not make sense. The 185 hp 3.5 gets great mileage for '11 and is smooth with a sporty exhaust note. It is possible to build a fairly smooth 2 liter 4. I'm hoping Ford got it right.

 

If the engine is tuned for premium you will get more power and usually better fuel mileage on premium because the pcm has to retard the timing to prevent knock when using regular. But this is exactly the same situation with the 3.5L Ecoboost engine that's been out for awhile so I don't expect it to be any different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the engine is tuned for premium you will get more power and usually better fuel mileage on premium because the pcm has to retard the timing to prevent knock when using regular. But this is exactly the same situation with the 3.5L Ecoboost engine that's been out for awhile so I don't expect it to be any different.

I agree. Option price on the Explore is $995.according to Edmunds.com.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect the 2.0L eco-boost engine will require premium. I say this because the Flex with an eco-boost engine specifically states on the gas cap door that premium is required. With premium being a minimum of 10% and often 14/15% more expensive than regular gas here in Ontario, the mileage improvements need to be looked at very carefully as a holistic package. Was interested in the Flex until I saw this and looked at what I perceived to be real world numbers. So I bought another Edge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect the 2.0L eco-boost engine will require premium. I say this because the Flex with an eco-boost engine specifically states on the gas cap door that premium is required. With premium being a minimum of 10% and often 14/15% more expensive than regular gas here in Ontario, the mileage improvements need to be looked at very carefully as a holistic package. Was interested in the Flex until I saw this and looked at what I perceived to be real world numbers. So I bought another Edge.

 

Hi Theakerr. :D Just to avoid confusion for others (not trying to argue, only provide the correct information for others): Premium fuel is not required for the 3.5L EcoBoost in the Flex, Taurus SHO, MKS and MKT. Premium is the recommended fuel if the driver wishes to obtain the maximum (and published) power outputs (HP, torque). In addition, the vehicles were EPA tested using premium. However, regular gas can be used and the engine management system will adjust operating parameters accordingly. This information is readily available on the Ford website and other resources.

 

This information is correct for U.S. spec vehicles and I am not sure where you live and. If you are in Canada, perhaps the vehicle requirements are different (I just do not know). But regular fuel (87 octane) is perfectly acceptable in U.S spec EcoBoost 3.5L's

 

Hope this clears up any confusion.

 

Good luck. :beerchug:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi bbf2530,

What you have said is what I had read and thought to be correct until I actually test drove a Flex and looked at the sticker inside the gas filler. It very specifically said "Premium Gas Required". When I brought it up with the salesman, he repeated what the sticker said. FYI, I do live in Canada. All I can say, again not trying to be argumentative.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi bbf2530,

What you have said is what I had read and thought to be correct until I actually test drove a Flex and looked at the sticker inside the gas filler. It very specifically said "Premium Gas Required". When I brought it up with the salesman, he repeated what the sticker said. FYI, I do live in Canada. All I can say, again not trying to be argumentative.

 

When in doubt - RTFM:

 

3.5L V6 EcoBoost engine

Your vehicle is designed to run on regular fuel with an octane rating of

87 or higher. For best overall performance, premium fuel with an octane

Maintenance and Specifications

364

rating of 91 or higher is recommended. The performance gained by using

premium fuel will be most noticeable in hot weather or in severe duty

applications such as towing a trailer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi bbf2530,

What you have said is what I had read and thought to be correct until I actually test drove a Flex and looked at the sticker inside the gas filler. It very specifically said "Premium Gas Required". When I brought it up with the salesman, he repeated what the sticker said. FYI, I do live in Canada. All I can say, again not trying to be argumentative.

 

 

Hi Theakerr. :D Although I already know the answer firsthand, I decide to do some research so I could provide a direct quote from Ford. So in addition to the information that akirby provided directly from the Flex Owners Manual, the following information is obtained directly from Ford of Canada: "Perhaps more important than quick starts from a standstill, the EcoBoost engine enables Flex to return the same fuel economy of 13.1/9.2 L/100 km, city/highway as the 262-hp Duratec V6 found in non-EcoBoost AWD models (premium fuel is recommended; regular is acceptable)."

 

As is shown, Ford clearly states that premium fuel is recommended (not required), but regular can also be used.

 

With all due respect (and really not being argumentative), this information is common knowledge and is also easily obtainable through the Ford of Canada website and other basic research. Or simply Google "EcoBoost Canada". I would also recommend calling Ford directly if anyone doubts this information.

 

Since I was not there, I obviously will not argue with what you state you saw on the fuel cap , although I would ask if perhaps it stated "Premium fuel recommended" as opposed to "required? However, as far as what the salesperson stated, he is completely incorrect and unfortunately, that is not an entirely unusual event for salespeople and the vehicles they sell. :banghead:

 

The bottom line is that the 3.5L EcoBoost engine in the Flex, SHO, MKS and MKT does not require premium fuel. Premium fuel is simply recommended to get the maximum performance form the engine, but regular is also acceptable and can be used with only a small drop in performance.

 

Hopefully this information clears up any remaining confusion. If not, all anyone has to do is Google Ecoboost Canada for the definitive answer.

 

Good luck. :beerchug:

Edited by bbf2530

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone know the trailer weight limit for the 2.0L ECO engine will be? I presently have a '10 Ford Flex with the ECO option and I love it. I'm in the process of selling my trailer mounted boat and when it 's gone, I think I'll slip down to an Edge with ECO. I understand the regular Edge with the trailer package has a 3500 lb limit. I'm hoping the 2.0 ECO has a similar limit. I could live with 2500 lbs, but I would certainly prefer 3500 lbs.

 

Re the premium, I could care less. That's all I feed my Flex. Hey, we're only talking $2 or $3 extra for the good gas. Now if I drove 20k yearly, maybe I would think about it, but I don't.

Edited by Starflyr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×