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jdangius

Snow Chains

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I am driving to Reno this coming weekend in a AWD Edge with 20" wheels. Do i install chains on front tires or back?

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ummm...what?

 

 

It can be extremely HAZARDOUS to drive a vehicle with higher traction on the front vs the rear, moreso a FWD or F/awd. For instance NO tire shop will accept the liability of mounting winter specialty tires on the front without at least equal on the rear. If you can manually engage the rear drive you could probably get by with chains only on the rear, PROVIDED you do not leave the rear drive engaged for any distance on a highly tractive roadbed.

 

But be sure and check that you can safely mount tire chains on the rear as many FWD vehicle manufacturers do not provide enough clearance at the rear.

Edited by wwest

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I am driving to Reno this coming weekend in a AWD Edge with 20" wheels. Do i install chains on front tires or back?

 

 

I don't think you need to worry about snow next weekend. Also why would you need the chains on an AWD?

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I don't think you need to worry about snow next weekend. Also why would you need the chains on an AWD?

 

Ice and driving up steep snow cover roads.

Just because it's AWD doesn't mean it can handle every road condition.

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Ice and driving up steep snow cover roads.

Just because it's AWD doesn't mean it can handle every road condition.

The AWD Edge is the best car to handle snow and ice. We live in Canada and we drive in the snow every day right now. I never had slip or problem stopping with this car, I think a chains are little overkill.

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I have 17 inch wheels and the chains do not fit on the rear of the car. There is only enough clearance on the front.

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The AWD Edge is the best car to handle snow and ice. We live in Canada and we drive in the snow every day right now. I never had slip or problem stopping with this car, I think a chains are little overkill.

 

 

Just because you live in Canada doesn't mean you have driven in all driving conditions.

There are areas in the US that have made chains or studded tires mandatory.

Overkill or prevention from being killed?

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The AWD Edge is the best car to handle snow and ice. We live in Canada and we drive in the snow every day right now. I never had slip or problem stopping with this car, I think a chains are little overkill.

 

 

"..best car to handle.."

 

Not by a country mile...!!

 

Almost ANY R/awd vehicle or even a simple RWD wil outperfrom the F/awd Edge. If you must buy a F/awd then the Acura/Honda SH-AWD is the best of the best by a very wide margin.

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"..best car to handle.."

 

Not by a country mile...!!

 

Almost ANY R/awd vehicle or even a simple RWD wil outperfrom the F/awd Edge. If you must buy a F/awd then the Acura/Honda SH-AWD is the best of the best by a very wide margin.

 

^ Please do NOT pay attention to anything this man types.

He is only here to "stir the pot" and doesn't even own an Edge or MKX.

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"..best car to handle.."

 

Not by a country mile...!!

 

Almost ANY R/awd vehicle or even a simple RWD wil outperfrom the F/awd Edge. If you must buy a F/awd then the Acura/Honda SH-AWD is the best of the best by a very wide margin.

 

wwest has F/awd phobia. His claim that a RWD car will outperform an awd edge is ludicrous. I can attest to the fact that it is nearly impossible to get an AWD edge to lose traction in any winter driving conditions available in the last two winters (two of the snowiest on record) here in Iowa.

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wwest has F/awd phobia. His claim that a RWD car will outperform an awd edge is ludicrous. I can attest to the fact that it is nearly impossible to get an AWD edge to lose traction in any winter driving conditions available in the last two winters (two of the snowiest on record) here in Iowa.

 

 

Our DD is an '01 F/awd RX300. Prior to that was a '00 F/awd RX300, before that a '92 Jeep Cherokee Limited AWD/4WD/4X4 and before that was an '85 Jeep Cherokee Limited. The '92 Jeep is still doing stellar duty on a north central MT cattle and wheat ranch.

 

The '01 F/awd RX300 has wheel spacers so that rear tire chains can be fitted first and then the fronts added if/when needed. Otherwise it runs all year around on nice and quiet, comfortably riding, Bridgestone Turanza summer tread tires.

Edited by wwest

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wwest has F/awd phobia. His claim that a RWD car will outperform an awd edge is ludicrous. I can attest to the fact that it is nearly impossible to get an AWD edge to lose traction in any winter driving conditions available in the last two winters (two of the snowiest on record) here in Iowa.

 

 

"...nearly impossible..."

 

And that spells the difference. Loss of traction on the drive wheels of a RWD vehicle leaves the driver in "control", whereas with FWD or F/awd......

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"...nearly impossible..."

 

And that spells the difference. Loss of traction on the drive wheels of a RWD vehicle leaves the driver in "control", whereas with FWD or F/awd......

 

the driver just lifts off the gas and everything is fine.

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the driver just lifts off the gas and everything is fine.

 

For everyone else in the universe, FWD is easier to control than RWD in low traction conditions, but not for wwest.

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Just because you live in Canada doesn't mean you have driven in all driving conditions.

There are areas in the US that have made chains or studded tires mandatory.

Overkill or prevention from being killed?

 

In the US, as elsewhere I'm sure, if you have a four-wheel drive or AWD then rules for chains/studs generally do not apply. I live in Colorado and that's the rule here. So chains plus AWD is definite overkill. Mostly your traction is based on driver skill more than anything.

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I live up in the moluntains, get several snows around 6-10 inches. The AWD Edge (with 20 inch wheels and OE Pirelli tires) does great, no chains needed. Yes I have hills and ice. Yes it is my wife that drives it and she does fine. The few times I have driven it in the snow it does better than my 4x4 Expedition I drive when the weather is bad. The AWD Edge kicks butt in the snow and ice compared to any other vehicle i have driven in similar conditions. To make it even better when these OE tires wear out I am planning to get a set of winter specific tires and have a second set of summer tires. It will do even better with real winter tires.

 

I just can not see where you would need chains with an AWD Edge. Unless you are out when you shoud not be on the road. Or when you need a real big high clearance 4x4 truck. Use your sense and drive reasonable, the Edge will work great.

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In the US, as elsewhere I'm sure, if you have a four-wheel drive or AWD then rules for chains/studs generally do not apply. I live in Colorado and that's the rule here. So chains plus AWD is definite overkill. Mostly your traction is based on driver skill more than anything.

 

Here are the California laws.

 

•R1: Snow chains required; snow tires OK.

This basically requires all cars without snow tires (even 4WD cars without snow tires on all four wheels) to put snow chains on before proceeding any further; you'll often have to pass a checkpoint where the CHP or Caltrans check for this. This at least allows normal cars with good tires through without putting chains on. Even if you have snow tires, most cars must still carry chains under these conditions (this may also be checked at a checkpoint).

 

In California, a snow tire is pretty much any tire that the manufacturer has certified "M+S" (mud and snow) or similar on the sidewall, and / or that the CHP or Caltrans thinks will pass muster. A lot of modern tires with good all-weather tread patterns will do the trick here; if in doubt, put chains on anyway, or ask at the checkpoint ahead of time.

 

 

•R2: Snow chains required; 4WD with snow tires OK.

This is the most common requirement, basically restricting chain-free travel to 4WD vehicles with snow tires on all four wheels. Once again, you must still carry chains even with 4WD, and you may have to pass inspection at a checkpoint.

 

 

•R3: All vehicles snow chains required.

This is pretty obvious — there's a lot of snow and ice ahead, and no one's going to get through without putting chains on, 4WD or not.

 

AWD plus winter tires are good enough for most conditions but not all.

..and that "driver skill" comment is bullshit because even the most experienced driver can make a mistake.

 

Hemlock%20Valley%20Chains%20Mandatory%20sign.JPG

Edited by MOFSTEEL

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It can be extremely HAZARDOUS to drive a vehicle with higher traction on the front vs the rear, moreso a FWD or F/awd. For instance NO tire shop will accept the liability of mounting winter specialty tires on the front without at least equal on the rear. If you can manually engage the rear drive you could probably get by with chains only on the rear, PROVIDED you do not leave the rear drive engaged for any distance on a highly tractive roadbed.

 

But be sure and check that you can safely mount tire chains on the rear as many FWD vehicle manufacturers do not provide enough clearance at the rear.

 

 

This post really peaked my interest. How is it dangerous to have snow chains on the front but not the rear in an AWD vehicle? The vehicle automatically senses what tires are losing traction, which need power, which need braking, etc etc. Reading the rest of your post, it seems you're taking tidbits of information about a full four wheel drive and trying to apply it to an AWD. The two systems are not the same at all. Yes, if you engage a 4wd and get traction on all four tires while turning you can do some serious damage. But this is the beauty of AWD, that rule does not apply.

 

It's an interesting argument you propose.. but doesn't really make any sense when you consider how AWD operates.

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This post really peaked my interest. How is it dangerous to have snow chains on the front but not the rear in an AWD vehicle? The vehicle automatically senses what tires are losing traction, which need power, which need braking, etc etc. Reading the rest of your post, it seems you're taking tidbits of information about a full four wheel drive and trying to apply it to an AWD. The two systems are not the same at all. Yes, if you engage a 4wd and get traction on all four tires while turning you can do some serious damage. But this is the beauty of AWD, that rule does not apply.

 

It's an interesting argument you propose.. but doesn't really make any sense when you consider how AWD operates.

 

 

"...consider how AWD operates...."

 

Which AWD type..? Base FWD therefore F/awd, or base RWD therefore R/awd..?

 

And even beyond that, there are a myriad of F/awd and R/awd designs out there in teh marketplace today.

 

But think of why truckers are always required to have rear drag chains on the rear most axle of their trailers....

 

So if you MUST use tire chains they should always go on the REAR first. So if you have a FWD or F/awd vehicle then for safties sake you should NEVER have tire chains ONLY on the front.

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"...consider how AWD operates...."

 

Which AWD type..? Base FWD therefore F/awd, or base RWD therefore R/awd..?

 

And even beyond that, there are a myriad of F/awd and R/awd designs out there in teh marketplace today.

 

But think of why truckers are always required to have rear drag chains on the rear most axle of their trailers....

 

So if you MUST use tire chains they should always go on the REAR first. So if you have a FWD or F/awd vehicle then for safties sake you should NEVER have tire chains ONLY on the front.

 

The type of AWD system doesn't matter, either one works differently from a true 4 wheel drive system. The system is in operation at all times unlike 4 wheel drive that you need to disengage when you'll be getting traction on dry surface to keep from busting something. [Let me add that something will bust when turning with 4wd when getting traction, I don't mean just going in a straight line]

 

Now in regards to the point of truckers. There are subtle differences between an 18 wheeler and a Ford Edge. The first being that most 18 wheelers are a little heavier than a Ford Edge. But yes, if you'll be towing a semi trailer with your Ford Edge it is good advice to put "drag chains" on the rear most axle of the trailer. This is to aid in stopping the mass of weight you have and to keep from jack knifing your rig. (That would be an ugly mess to see a Ford Edge pulling a semi trailer suddenly jack-knifed cuz the yahoo didn't put on drag chains, eh?) If you are pulling a smaller trailer (smaller than semi trailer) in bad weather it would probably be a good idea to have drag chains on that too. Just to avoid a not so spectacular (but still awful) jack-knife incident.

 

But getting back to snow chains on a Ford Edge. It's not going to break anything... (in regards to the AWD system) because it senses which wheels have traction and which don't. It shouldn't have a large impact on braking because you have anti lock brakes, so the system takes care of that end of things too.

 

i do agree with you though. Definitely put "drag chains" on your rear most axle of your semi trailer. That way they can do the job that drag chains are named for. Drag yer butt and make you stop in a nice straight line. No Ford Edge's jack-knifed with their semi trailer. :D

 

Cheers

Edited by Z4forEdge

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