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Edge Guide

Ford Edge Towing Guide

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Hi, I just clicked on the above link to the Edge towing guide in Post #1 and there is no PDF file for the Ford Edge. Lots of other Ford vehicles but no Edge, am I missing something?

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And thus why I kept my Excursion with the 7.3 all these years :)

The Edge is more car than truck.

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I know my 2019 Edge is rated for towing 3500 lbs.  But how is that determined?  Is it the engine / transmission (but couldn't you just go slower on hills, or avoid hills all together)?  Is it the weight on the hitch (but you can distribute the weight over the trailer axle.  Or is it the weight the tow vehicle can stop within a certain distance starting from a certain speed (without shearing off the bolts that mount the brake calibers to the frame)?

 

So, if it is the later, are they assuming a bare trailer without brakes?  If the trailer has hydraulic brakes, would this increase the tow rating?

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9 hours ago, phillman5 said:

I know my 2019 Edge is rated for towing 3500 lbs.  But how is that determined?


Someone will be along with a more technically oriented answer I'm sure but here's my take:

 

Your Edge does not have a 'frame' in the traditional (pickup truck) sense.  All the stress of a hitch is being taken by the unibody which is, basically, a welded together box with lots of holes in it to accept body panels.  The unibody is mostly simple sheet metal, not nearly as strong as a big beefy frame which is 'part' of the reason for the low tow rating.   I'm sure brakes play a part in the calculation along with stresses on the transmission and other components (note the 3500 lb rating is 'only' with the factory tow package with its larger radiator and other special bits).  Trailer brakes are addressed in your owner's manual which says "Separate functioning brake systems are required for safe control of towed vehicles and trailers weighing more than 1500 pounds (680 kilograms) when load." (sic)

 

The Edge's GVWR is also part of the calculation since at least 10% of the trailer's weight is on the vehicle.  Add that potential 350 lbs or more plus a couple of passengers and you'll be pretty close to maxed out.  We also can't forget the tires.  They have a maximum load rating too (it's on the sidewall) so too much trailer weight on the hitch could affect that rating as well.

 

And finally there's the bean counters 'abundance of caution' to consider.  I'm sure they build in some sort of percentage in an effort to prevent people who can't follow instructions from injuring themselves or others.

 

Bottom line, if you have the factory tow package, read your manual and stick to the recommendations.  If not, consider the impact on your cooling system at the very least and follow the manual's recommendation.

 

Cheers!

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I know this is an old topic but I'm curious as to why the 2019 Escape with the 2.0 has the same tow rating of 3500 just like my 2020 Edge ST. Using the unibody argument @Gadgetjq refers to, it would seem the ST having a larger "frame", bigger brakes, better cooling and more power that it should have a higher tow rating. Thoughts on this?

 

BTW, I'm very familiar with towing, capacities, weight and balance, tongue weight, hitch types, etc., having many RV's and tow vehicles. It befuddles me that other CUV's in the ST class have higher ratings.

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4 hours ago, poontanghooligan said:

I know this is an old topic but I'm curious as to why the 2019 Escape with the 2.0 has the same tow rating of 3500 just like my 2020 Edge ST. Using the unibody argument @Gadgetjq refers to, it would seem the ST having a larger "frame", bigger brakes, better cooling and more power that it should have a higher tow rating. Thoughts on this?

 

BTW, I'm very familiar with towing, capacities, weight and balance, tongue weight, hitch types, etc., having many RV's and tow vehicles. It befuddles me that other CUV's in the ST class have higher ratings.

 

I don't think you'll ever get the real answer. It could an engineering issue, some part that can't handle the extra load. A safety issue, or even a marketing plot to push customers to go to bigger more expensive vehicles.

 

I recall back in the 90's, the Grand Marquis had a 5000lbs tow rating, but in its last year's it was only 2000lbs, inspire of it being a body on frame that supposedly was improved over the years.

https://www.towratings.net/model/grand+marquis

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Looking over the various trim levels, it' appears to be related to engine ft.lb. ratings. With the 2.0L its 1,500 lbs. and 3,500 lbs. with the 3.5L. Looking at the Sport, the engine isn't rating for towing even though it has higher hp rating.

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I honestly think it was a marketing thing.  The european models have a much higher tow rating, and honestly the engine and trans can take it.  I found a post recently where someone towed a huge caravan/mobile home behind them up and down the mountains of CO, with a trans temp gauge, and their temps were perfectly fine.  I think it's honestly to encourage people to buy their more expensive, more premium model trucks if you plan to tow at all.  Why buy an F150 or an Explorer ST if you can tow 3500-4000lbs with a significantly less expensive Edge?  

 

 

I've personally towed a 1998 Eclipse GSX AWD, with a spare engine, and a ton of parts, roughly 9 hours and my temps were great.  Didn't struggle at all.  Braking was good, would absolutely do it again.  I know I'm bumping a little, but figured this info was relevant. 

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