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Ok, if you can find out, that would be great :) And good luck on your upcoming trip, hope the HM oil works out.

Made the appointment to replace the drivers side strut bearing mount and found out the passenger side was a master pro part that failed and was replaced with a MOOG strut bearing mount. I replaced almost every part of the suspension with MOOG parts except the strut bearing mounts. Guess which parts are failing? lol Moral to the story I guess is do not buy master pro parts. Stick with MOOG

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All done with drivers side strut bearing mount replacement. Installed a MOOG replacement part. Had it done at garage and cost 240.00 dollars. that being said cheap parts cost way to much. Get the good stuff the first time.

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255,000 miles now and had my Gas Cap light turn on. Went to autozone and 13 dollars later the light is off and have an new gas cap. Wish all repairs were this cheap and fast. Changed oil with second round of mobile 1 high mileage. Could not find a leak per the mechanice since I drove in during a down pour of rain and the whole under carriage was essentially power washed. Good news though after 5000 miles that 3.5 had only used half a quart of oil. Think I will keep on trucking.

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Well the gas cap may not be the problem as the light has return and is on. The next level indication is that the Evaporation tank is either leaking or the tank it's self has failed. Not sure which at this point. The next question is where is this tank located and it appears there is a seperate purge valve or something on it. I am looking to replace it my self if the access is easy and up front unbolt and rebolt replacement. Anyone know where it is located?

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The EVAP purge valve is located along the firewall, next to the brake fluid reservoir. Most of the EVAP components though are underneath the vehicle, including the Canister and Canister Vent Solenoid.

 

 

Removal and Installation

WARNING: The evaporative emission system contains fuel vapor and condensed fuel vapor. Although not present in large quantities, it still presents the danger of explosion or fire. Disconnect the battery ground cable from the battery to minimize the possibility of an electrical spark occurring, which can cause a fire or explosion if fuel vapor or liquefied fuel are present in the area. Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.

WARNING: Do not smoke or carry lighted tobacco or open flame of any type when working on or near any fuel-related component. Highly flammable mixtures are always present and may be ignited. Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.

WARNING: Do not carry personal electronic devices such as cell phones, pagers or audio equipment of any type when working on or near any fuel-related components. Highly flammable mixtures are always present and may be ignited. Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.

  1. NOTE: Correct placement of the hoist arm to the frame lifting point is essential for the removal and installation of the evaporative emission (EVAP) canister assembly.

    With the vehicle in NEUTRAL, position it on a hoist. For additional information, refer to Section 100-02 .
  1. Remove the 3 bolts, pushpin retainer and the evaporative emission (EVAP) shield.
    • To install, tighten to 9 Nm (80 lb-in).
  1. Disconnect the EVAP canister vent solenoid electrical connector.
  1. Disconnect the 2 quick connect couplings from the EVAP canister assembly. For additional information, refer to Section 310-00 .
  1. Disconnect the EVAP vapor tube from the EVAP dust separator.
  1. Remove the 3 EVAP canister assembly bracket bolts.
    • To install, tighten to 9 Nm (80 lb-in).
  1. Release the EVAP canister assembly pushpin retainer and remove the EVAP canister assembly.
  1. NOTE: When installing the EVAP canister assembly, insert the alignment tab into the body first, then install the pushpin and 3 bolts.

    To install, reverse the removal procedure.
    • Carry out the evaporative emission repair verification drive cycle. For additional information, refer to Powertrain Control/Emissions Diagnosis (PC/ED) manual.

 

====================================================

 

Removal and Installation

WARNING: The evaporative emission system contains fuel vapor and condensed fuel vapor. Although not present in large quantities, it still presents the danger of explosion or fire. Disconnect the battery ground cable from the battery to minimize the possibility of an electrical spark occurring, which can cause a fire or explosion if fuel vapor or liquefied fuel are present in the area. Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.

WARNING: Do not smoke or carry lighted tobacco or open flame of any type when working on or near any fuel-related component. Highly flammable mixtures are always present and may be ignited. Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.

WARNING: Do not carry personal electronic devices such as cell phones, pagers or audio equipment of any type when working on or near any fuel-related components. Highly flammable mixtures are always present and may be ignited. Failure to follow these instructions may result in personal injury.

  1. NOTE: Correct placement of the hoist arm to the frame lifting point is essential for the removal and installation of the evaporative emission (EVAP) canister assembly.

    With the vehicle in NEUTRAL, position it on a hoist. For additional information, refer to Section 100-02 .
  1. Remove the 3 bolts, pushpin retainer and the evaporative emission (EVAP) shield.
    • To install, tighten to 9 Nm (80 lb-in).
  1. Disconnect the EVAP canister vent solenoid electrical connector.
  1. Disconnect the 2 quick connect couplings from the EVAP canister assembly. For additional information, refer to Section 310-00 .
  1. Disconnect the EVAP vapor tube from the EVAP dust separator.
  1. Remove the 3 EVAP canister assembly bracket bolts.
    • To install, tighten to 9 Nm (80 lb-in).
  1. Release the EVAP canister assembly pushpin retainer and remove the EVAP canister assembly.
  1. NOTE: When installing the EVAP canister assembly, insert the alignment tab into the body first, then install the pushpin and 3 bolts.

    To install, reverse the removal procedure.
    • Carry out the evaporative emission repair verification drive cycle. For additional information, refer to Powertrain Control/Emissions Diagnosis (PC/ED) manual.

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post-23566-0-96235400-1413850000_thumb.jpg

Edited by WWWPerfA_ZN0W
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Thanks, After a bit of searching and investigation. I have mostly determined that the Purge valve has the highest probability of failure and is usually the first part to check and verify. What do you think?

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The solenoid is what used to go bad on older vehicles (read 90's), have no idea on the valve itself. Maybe pull off the hoses see if there is blockage? Don't know if it could be cleaned out.

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Checking the solenoid is a good first step. But given the age and mileage on this vehicle there could be more than one problem. Scanner Danner's YouTube channel shows how he tracked down a solenoid problem. Neat way to figure it out but he's got all the right test equipment for this. Without all the test equipment like he uses I've had to resort to other means. Like using a spray bottle and water on every vacuum component I could physically get to while listening to changes in the engine idle speed.

 

Here's how he did it:

 

Having been down the road of inexpensive suspension parts (and their accompanying failures) you're absolutely correct in finding them to be no "bargains".

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Thanks XB70, but you sound like my doctor when you start talking age and mileage. :)

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Well my doctor reminds me that I've got a few years plus lots of miles on my ragged old carcass. At least with your Edge all the parts are replaceable. :)

 

Looking at the body of your Edge tells me you don't spend much time on our lovely Iowa dirt roads. It looks in great shape. I work in a small town north of you and spend a lot of time on gravel. The work truck's rocker panels get pounded by the gravel. Rust sets in pretty quickly. Did you get the Edge undercoated?

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XB70 no undercoating. Almost every mile is interstate. Passenger side a little dinged up from some guy that felt he want the lane I was in (he was given ticket number 21 when he hit me). I could not imagine having 21 tickets on my license. Can hardly tell unless you look. Front end is a little off due to hitting a gator (truck retread). I have a dash cam and have a few videos of me missing bambi. Only a matter of time till I get one.

Edited by macbwt
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With 21 tickets did this guy insurance?? Or a license??

 

In this part of the country there are only two kinds of cars. Those that have hit deer and those that will hit deer. My buddy in Wisconsin owns some auto body shops. He says the inside joke in the business is how much they enjoy grilled venison. In other words, venison in your grill. He scored twice with my cars.

 

Being of the persuasion that I'll keep this new Edge for a while I splurged on the undercoating. Will it matter? When my Edge hits the odometer reading yours has then we'll compare notes.

 

Did you get a chance to look into the problem with the evap system? While perusing through various YouTube channels I've come across some home made smoke generators. We may be driving cars with more computer technology than the first space shots but there are still some clever shade tree mechanics there.The man said "Smoke is smoke. It doesn't matter if it comes from a fancy machine or an old wine bottle full of charcoal." The idea is to just get smoke into the engine vacuum flow. And it worked.

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No idea how that guy could even still drive on the road? Still have the question unanswered, but he had insurance!! Did you notice the lack of Ford Edge repair videos? I plan on doing an amatuer video of my replacement and posting it on my youtube. I have asked my regular mechanic to do so, but he is shy or does not want his ex-wife to know where he is working (LOL).

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Did you notice the lack of Ford Edge repair videos?

I thought they just send them to the crusher straight away.

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I thought they just send them to the crusher straight away.

Most likely option when I trade my Ford Edge in. Or maybe it will be worth more in parts than as a whole vehicle.

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Go figure the gas cap light has went out. I did replace the gas cap a while back. Ligtht has been out for two or three days now. 1) the light burnt out or 2) the gas cap fixed the problem.

Edited by macbwt

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Oil changed again with High Mileage oil mobil one. Used one quart in 5k miles. ODO reading 259,200 mi. Oil usage a little high based on past changes. This would be the most ever used. I still have not changed out the PCV which is now climbing to the top of the list.

Edited by macbwt

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I did not see the oil. That being said the same folks that change it have been changing it for as long as I have owned it. They are usually pretty good and informing me of visiable color changes in the vehicle fluids. Never had an issue even once with their services and they were the ones that stressed to me to change over to high mileage oil to help the seal that was leaking.

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Congrats on the high mileage! Takes good maintenance and a good driver to get as far as you have.

 

My parents drove our '10 right at 20K/yr. My wife put 40K on her 03 Chevy K2500 CCSB Gasser in 13months, w/ something that doesnt get 12mpg I bet she goes further. My mom averaged 26mpg to town and back, nearly 30 on the open road a few times, I hope my wife can replicate it. We plan to keep our car 5yrs which could put us near 300K miles or more.

Edited by tanman_2006

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I used to say I would drive it till the wheels, tranny or engine fall off or out. So far none of the mentioned parts have done that. Although I have completely rebuilt the front suspension components. After a chrysler, Suzuki, and Chevy the Ford has so far gone the furthest with the least number of non consumable repairs.

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