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Help me out on this: There was once a concern about having to replace all of the tires on an AWD vehicle if one of them were damaged past the point of a repair and there would be (not sure of the actual number) say more than 3/16" in dia. between the new tire and the old ones. I seem to remember reading that even slight differences in tire diameter causes the car's computer and drive-train to do things that would harm the drive line. Is this still true today? If this is true, that would be a big financial hit if it were to happen.

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we have a fwd torrent, and with winter tires is ok, there are still issues when we get dumps of snow greater than 10"....so this time around we made sure

we bought an edge with awd.

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Help me out on this: There was once a concern about having to replace all of the tires on an AWD vehicle if one of them were damaged past the point of a repair and there would be (not sure of the actual number) say more than 3/16" in dia. between the new tire and the old ones. I seem to remember reading that even slight differences in tire diameter causes the car's computer and drive-train to do things that would harm the drive line. Is this still true today? If this is true, that would be a big financial hit if it were to happen.

 

Yes, you do need to keep your tires within 3/16" front to back, or you do risk damaging Ford's Power Takeoff Unit. I recently had an issue where my PTU had a sever leak (2011 Fusion Sport 53,000 miles with a previous warranty claim on it), and a dealer tried to void my powertrain warranty based on the tires. Luckily, I had it towed to another dealer, who measured my tread depth (it was in spec), and determined the severe leak was the problem, not a tire issue.

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Excellent feedback, Thank You! From the sounds of it, FWD with good winter tires are most cost effective.

 

I'm currently in a Honda Civic, and have never been stuck with good tires.

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just picked up a sport with FWD here in northern california. I'm really regretting not getting an AWD one. the Sport 2.7 makes so much power that im constantly feeling torque steer. If im not heavy on the gas, its fine. But this motor begs to be driven hard. The Edge Sport is my wifes car so its not that huge of a deal, because shes none the wiser.

 

However, anyone considering an edge sport an planning on driving it in a sporty manner, Id highly recommend going with the AWD (regardless of what kind of weather you live in)

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Is AWD on Edge same on Subaru all the time on? Or it turns on only when there is s wheelslip?

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Is AWD on Edge same on Subaru all the time on? Or it turns on only when there is s wheelslip?

 

It's "Smart AWD", meaning that it's not on all the time.

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Smart refers to the ability to transfer torque to the rear BEFORE slip actually occurs, such as when you accelerate hard from a stop or accelerating while turning, etc. It uses steering angle, throttle position, yaw and other sensors to do this. But most of the time it is in FWD only.

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Recently, I rented ford fusion and it was FWD and had wheelspin on wet junction with traffic lights (when you start on green you can feel it has a little wheelspin)

 

When I drive my subaru which is all the time AWD I can really tell it's AWD since I never had wheelspin on wet after rain roads.

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