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Matthew123

full synthetic to semi?

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As @onyxbfly stated above, the Edge still uses Direct Injection only. The F-150 got dual injection in 2017 for the 3.5 EcoBoost only, then in 2018 the rest also got it. But all other EcoBoost Engines (AFAIK, and as per Ford's website as of today 07/07/2020) are still Direct Injection only, even the new Explorer, which was a clean new 2020 model & the first application of the 3.0 EcoBoost in longitudinal form.

 

Edit: The 2018+ Expedition is also PFI+DI like the F-150, although Ford's website states its only DI. So there goes relying on Ford as a credible source 😁.

Edited by omar302
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10 minutes ago, omar302 said:

As @onyxbfly stated above, the Edge still uses Direct Injection only. The F-150 got dual injection in 2017 for the 3.5 EcoBoost only, then in 2018 the rest also got it. But all other EcoBoost Engines (AFAIK, and as per Ford's website as of today 07/07/2020) are still Direct Injection only, even the new Explorer, which was a clean new 2020 model & the first application of the 3.0 EcoBoost in longitudinal form.

so basically for the edge to prevent carbon buildup do oil change every 5000 miles with  full synthetic or a catch can and hope for the best.

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4 hours ago, Matthew123 said:

so basically for the edge to prevent carbon buildup do oil change every 5000 miles with  full synthetic or a catch can and hope for the best.

 

I can't really give an answer. From my readings, there is no clear proof that a catch can will prevent it, nor that without it you'd actually get carbon buildup on EcoBoost engines. But regular maintenance and using good oils will definitely help, especially considering that new oils are getting better to tackle the issue. 

 

Here are some interesting related articles I found searching online if you are interested:

Valvoline explaining there oils: https://team.valvoline.com/diy/truth-behind-carbon-buildup

Oil standards, GF-5 being common & GF-6 about to be available: https://www.oilspecifications.org/ilsac.php. (There is an interim oil, labeled API SN Plus that kind off is between GF-5 & GF-6, Ford has already started specifying it for their vehicles starting 2018 I think).

Others:

https://www.enginelabs.com/news/video-is-running-your-engine-up-to-redline-actually-good-for-it/

https://www.mustangecoboost.net/threads/direct-injection-catch-cans-oil-changes.17251/

 

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There is no need for a catch can, they are a gimmick.

 

Synthetic is more heat resistant and does not break down.  It is not more resistant to carbon build-up.  GF-6 oil is what you want to use.   Does not matter synthetic or semi.  5000 miles is a short OCI and decent oil will work fine with such a short interval.

 

If you are getting carbon it would be in the intake tract and on the backside of the intake valves, not 'on the turbos'.

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Any direct injection engine will have a problem with carbon build up on the back side of valves.   But all EcoBoost engines went to dual injection in 2017...not just the F-150

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6 hours ago, omar302 said:

 

I can't really give an answer. From my readings, there is no clear proof that a catch can will prevent it, nor that without it you'd actually get carbon buildup on EcoBoost engines. But regular maintenance and using good oils will definitely help, especially considering that new oils are getting better to tackle the issue. 

 

Here are some interesting related articles I found searching online if you are interested:

Valvoline explaining there oils: https://team.valvoline.com/diy/truth-behind-carbon-buildup

Oil standards, GF-5 being common & GF-6 about to be available: https://www.oilspecifications.org/ilsac.php. (There is an interim oil, labeled API SN Plus that kind off is between GF-5 & GF-6, Ford has already started specifying it for their vehicles starting 2018 I think).

Others:

https://www.enginelabs.com/news/video-is-running-your-engine-up-to-redline-actually-good-for-it/

https://www.mustangecoboost.net/threads/direct-injection-catch-cans-oil-changes.17251/

 

i do oil change every 5000 miles with the motorcraft they put semi in but i will be going back to full synthetic so hopefully doing it every 5000 will help

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2 hours ago, THE_BOLT said:

Any direct injection engine will have a problem with carbon build up on the back side of valves.   But all EcoBoost engines went to dual injection in 2017...not just the F-150

Not true, the 2.7 still does not have dual injection.

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9 minutes ago, dajo2012 said:

Not true, the 2.7 still does not have dual injection.

i dont think 2.0 have em either if you look up 2.0 it shows direct injection

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I'm sorry...as of 2018 all ford EcoBoost engines have dual injection.  They call something else like dual fuel

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Seriously the only difference between the 2.7 engine in the F-150 and Edge is intake manifold, throttle body, exhaust manifold and intake tubing...oil pump drive possibly too. Which goes for all the engines!  The blocks and heads are drilled and tapped with the same oil galleys,  injector holes and so on...unless you have the H.O. EcoBoost engine like in the Raptor.  The only reason that everything you read says its for the F-150 is because that's Fords bread n butter.  

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24 minutes ago, THE_BOLT said:

I'm sorry...as of 2018 all ford EcoBoost engines have dual injection.  They call something else like dual fuel


Im sorry but that’s incorrect.  Only the 1.5L dragon (3 cylinder) and the 2nd gen 2.7 and 3.5 in RWD applications get dual injection.  All the rest including 2.0, 2.3, transverse 2.7 and 3.0 are direct injection.

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1 minute ago, THE_BOLT said:

Seriously the only difference between the 2.7 engine in the F-150 and Edge is intake manifold, throttle body, exhaust manifold and intake tubing...oil pump drive possibly too. Which goes for all the engines!  The blocks and heads are drilled and tapped with the same oil galleys,  injector holes and so on...unless you have the H.O. EcoBoost engine like in the Raptor.  The only reason that everything you read says its for the F-150 is because that's Fords bread n butter.  


Wrong.  Edge and Nautilus get the first gen 2.7 with direct injection only.  F150 gets the 2nd gen 2.7L with dual injection. 
 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_EcoBoost_engine

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Yes.  Direct injection until the PCM commands it to spray port side

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Wow, there is so much misinformation in this thread...

1) Matthew123: As some others have said here, switching to a synthetic-blend oil is A-OK after using full synthetic. Sure full-synthetic is best, but Motorcraft synth-blend is perfectly fine on your Edge.  5000 mile oil change intervals is also perfect - Ford recommends between 5,000 and 10,000 miles (and often just splits it down the middle and says 7,500 miles to make it easier). Unless you are driving under "severe" conditions, changing your oil far less that 5,000 miles is considered wasteful.

 

Modern oils are more than up to the job for 5,000 miles of daily driving.   If you want proof, I have gotten oil analysis done on my '17 Fusion Sport since it was new, as well as my '10 Focus and '14 Edge Sport when they hit their 100,000 mile marks after the oil was used for 5,000 miles (and a lifetime of 5,000 mile OCI's). Both the Focus and Edge have tested well at 5,000 miles on Motorcraft 5w20 synth-blend oils and no noticeable engine wear/materials. And for my Fusion Sport (which runs very hot from factory, and two turbos) does perfectly fine at 5,000 mile OCIs as well (albeit with full-synthetic). Heck, I did a track day with my Fusion last year - I changed the oil before the event, and ran it for 4,000 miles total, and it tested perfectly fine and still very usable. Personally, I say sick with your 5,000 mile changes.

 

2) The ONLY EcoBoost engines that use both port injection and direct injection are the 2nd gen 3.5L EB, 2nd gen 2.7L EB, and 1.5L 3-cyl EB. The current Edge ST and all 2nd gen Fusion Sports (so, up to 2019) with the 2.7L EcoBoost engine are only direct-injection.  EDIT: I started typing this before akirby posted, who is correct.

 

3) Installing a catch can will not "void your warranty". There is no "voiding your warranty". If you have a catch can and take your car to the dealer for an issue, the most they'll do is say "you modified you car, and that modification affected/caused this issue" and ford will void that warranty claim. That is all that happens, with any mod. If you tune your engine, there is no "voiding your warranty" so suspension issues are no longer covered, for example.

 

As for the catch can topic itself, that is (and will always be) highly debated. There are people on both sides with proof to lean either way. Personally, I've never used one and been OK.

Edited by DaMiFo

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59 minutes ago, THE_BOLT said:

How do you argue that with someone who builds them


How do build them and not know the difference?

 

Edge ST is DI only.   F150 is DI and PI.  Even Ford says so.

 

 

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1 hour ago, THE_BOLT said:

How do you argue that with someone who builds them

Because I have actually looked at mine there is not any extra injectors.   Just the original DI injectors (6). 

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3 hours ago, DaMiFo said:

Wow, there is so much misinformation in this thread...

1) Matthew123: As some others have said here, switching to a synthetic-blend oil is A-OK after using full synthetic. Sure full-synthetic is best, but Motorcraft synth-blend is perfectly fine on your Edge.  5000 mile oil change intervals is also perfect - Ford recommends between 5,000 and 10,000 miles (and often just splits it down the middle and says 7,500 miles to make it easier). Unless you are driving under "severe" conditions, changing your oil far less that 5,000 miles is considered wasteful.

 

Modern oils are more than up to the job for 5,000 miles of daily driving.   If you want proof, I have gotten oil analysis done on my '17 Fusion Sport since it was new, as well as my '10 Focus and '14 Edge Sport when they hit their 100,000 mile marks after the oil was used for 5,000 miles (and a lifetime of 5,000 mile OCI's). Both the Focus and Edge have tested well at 5,000 miles on Motorcraft 5w20 synth-blend oils and no noticeable engine wear/materials. And for my Fusion Sport (which runs very hot from factory, and two turbos) does perfectly fine at 5,000 mile OCIs as well (albeit with full-synthetic). Heck, I did a track day with my Fusion last year - I changed the oil before the event, and ran it for 4,000 miles total, and it tested perfectly fine and still very usable. Personally, I say sick with your 5,000 mile changes.

 

2) The ONLY EcoBoost engines that use both port injection and direct injection are the 2nd gen 3.5L EB, 2nd gen 2.7L EB, and 1.5L 3-cyl EB. The current Edge ST and all 2nd gen Fusion Sports (so, up to 2019) with the 2.7L EcoBoost engine are only direct-injection.  EDIT: I started typing this before akirby posted, who is correct.

 

3) Installing a catch can will not "void your warranty". There is no "voiding your warranty". If you have a catch can and take your car to the dealer for an issue, the most they'll do is say "you modified you car, and that modification affected/caused this issue" and ford will void that warranty claim. That is all that happens, with any mod. If you tune your engine, there is no "voiding your warranty" so suspension issues are no longer covered, for example.

 

As for the catch can topic itself, that is (and will always be) highly debated. There are people on both sides with proof to lean either way. Personally, I've never used one and been OK.

i know semi is ok for the edge but just tryin to not have carbon buildup if i can help it.just a peace of mind i guess. and for the catch can im split . i will also stick to my 5000 mile intervals

Edited by Matthew123

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49 minutes ago, Matthew123 said:

i know semi is ok for the edge but just tryin to not have carbon buildup if i can help it.just a peace of mind i guess. and for the catch can im split . i will also stick to my 5000 mile intervals

 

As others have said, honestly just stuck to good quality oil and change it, you'll be in good shape. You should have peace of mind knowing you're not using cheap oil.

Edited by DaMiFo
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2 minutes ago, DaMiFo said:

 

As others have said, honestly just stuck to good quality oil and change it, you'll be in good shape. You should have peace of mind knowing you're not using cheap oil.

is the ford motorcraft good quality cause they do my changes 

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1 hour ago, Matthew123 said:

is the ford motorcraft good quality cause they do my changes 


Yes just don’t go over 7500 miles.

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