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erikgrad

Have you ever had the 'Door Ajar' issue? Please file a complaint with NHTSA, link provided

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Sorry to start a new thread about this, but as forum user PaulSchott posted Monday, the NHTSA is investigating complaints over the door ajar issue that is common on certain years of the Ford Edge. If you have ever had this issue, and have not made the time to file a complaint with the NHTSA, now is the time to do so. They need your VIN, but nothing else about it is complicated, give them as much or as little detail as you want. You may not feel that it is a safety complaint, but it is difficult to know whether the door latch system is compromised entirely or a sensor is just dirty, so this matters.

 

Here is the link to file your complaint: https://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/VehicleComplaint/

 

I have been dealing with this door latch sensor issue for the duration of my ownership on my Ford Edge. I don't see how it is possible that our vehicles meet NHTSA standard Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 206, Door locks and door retention components. The testing for that standard would have been done in a laboratory, and it is apparent that contaminants out in the field are making their way into the door lock assembly and compromising the sensor - it is not a stretch to consider the latch itself may be deteriorating as well. Ford should either have to replace the latch system with one that has a lower failure rate, or do sufficient testing on malfunctioning vehicles from the field that prove the latch strength is still within FMVSS standards. Although it's a minor inconvenience compared to the issue of interior lights coming on while driving at nighttime from the unpredictable sensor, I just had a battery fail from the sensor. While parked, even for hours and days on end untouched, the car will sense the door is opened and closed, and the parking/convenience lighting will come on and go back off again. I am out of warranty, not in a position where I am spending $400 for a fix that will only last months.

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I don't think this will result in a recall because the latch itself isn't failing so there is no immediate danger. But I do think they might convince Ford to extend the warranty which is what they should have done anyway.

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I don't think this will result in a recall because the latch itself isn't failing so there is no immediate danger. But I do think they might convince Ford to extend the warranty which is what they should have done anyway.

You may be right, but the condition of the door latch load strength may be changing as well when the doors wont stay locked. That'd invalidate the door testing done to comply with FMVSS, which would have been done with the doors locked (I don't know this for a fact, I just believe it to be the case).

 

Five years ago, this would not have resulted in a recall. It might result in a recall now, since NHTSA is closely scrutinizing all of Ford's miscellaneous latch issues (NHTSA issued another Ford latch recall just this morning).

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Agreed if there is an impact to latch strength, but I would think if that was the case Ford would have already recalled it along with the others. That shouldn't be hard to figure out by testing latches with failed sensors.

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I saw on the news that Ford is about to recall the Ford Edge for the door ajar sensor issue. Hopefully they do it soon.

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Agreed if there is an impact to latch strength, but I would think if that was the case Ford would have already recalled it along with the others. That shouldn't be hard to figure out by testing latches with failed sensors.

 

Okay, after a day of reading about it, I see your point, they will probably do this under an "extended service campaign" or whatever Ford calls it. I remember having one for my Focus. I know they won't be permitted to, but I kind of wish they were allowed to just add a $1 physical button switch near the door striker to sense open or closed.

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Also when this happens it's not catastrophic, so waiting for it to fail then replacing it under warranty is ok. As opposed to the latches that actually fail causing the door to potentially fly open while driving - that necessitates a recall to replace the latches before they fail.

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This has been happening to many models of Fords for a really long time. I went through this with a 2004 Taurus.

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I had the issue, but it was repaired under extended warranty (of course still cost me $$) it will be an interesting discussion if they do recall / extended warren to this as I'll be trying to get my $$ back from them!

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2012 ford edge Limited When I reached 30,000 miles the drivers door latch caused me 429.00 dollars to fix. I went to Google and found out so many had the same problem with the same miles as mine. Now my rear camera is out. Nice ford your doing a bang up job.

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A video addressing the door latch issues and how to report.

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This gremlin just reared its ugly head on my 2013 Edge SEL, with 43,000 miles on it. Read many of the quick fixes on the forums here and have tried a few with mixed success.

 

I hesitate to go further with some of the fixes that either require the cutting and grounding of the sensor wire, or using a small die grinder to carve away some plastic/metal from the sensor trigger as both of these require modifications that Ford could simply say "oops, YOU did that, so no recall for you".

 

I've also reported it to NHTSA, and hopefully it will initiate a recall!! Driving with my family, its disturbing that I can't "lock the doors" on the car while we are driving, especially with the kids in the car!!

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If it's really such a safety issue, then you should replace the latch immediately. As long as you save the receipt, if a recall is issued later you will get reimbursed.

 

Not replacing the latch because you're waiting for a recall and then saying you're worried about your family's safety is ridiculous.

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Just some positive input. 60,000+ miles, 2013 Edge SE, Worst problem and only problem, dead battery @ 54,000. Love my Edge.

 

Burke

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If it's really such a safety issue, then you should replace the latch immediately. As long as you save the receipt, if a recall is issued later you will get reimbursed.

 

Not replacing the latch because you're waiting for a recall and then saying you're worried about your family's safety is ridiculous.

 

 

Well, akirby, I said it was "disturbing, not that I was "worried for their safety.'...so way to go for that one . I'd think as a "moderator", you'd be a little less prone to trying to dog someone out for posting on the forums when they'd like to talk about or vent on a technical issue that Ford should be recalling anyways. I'm pretty sure you guys want people to use the forums for folks to openly discuss things...and not be shamed for doing so.

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If they had a permanent fix for the problem, I'd agree with the sentiment that we should replace and await reimbursement if a recall were to happen... problem is that it is not an inexpensive repair, and there has been little or no improvement in the latch design AFAIK.

 

They last a year or two before relapsing into a repeat of the problem.. Spending hundreds of dollars per failed door sensor each year isn't a sustainable approach.

 

With the new approach to government regulation right now, I have serious doubts as to whether there will ever be a recall. Anyone who is mechanically inclined may want to consider the permanent DIY fixes.

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There have been others in the past who have claimed it's a serious safety issue to the point they are afraid to drive the vehicle. Yet they continue driving it hoping for Ford to issue a recall so they can get it done for free.

 

I have no problem with folks saying it's a safety issue. It is although I think it's pretty minimal, therefore I have no problem with folks asking for a recall.

 

I think at the least they should engineer a better part and extend the warranty to 100K miles. No disagreement there.

 

Where I have a problem is when people use the "serious safety issue" angle to the point they say they're afraid for their safety while driving yet they don't bother to spend a few hundred bucks to fix the problem for at least a few more years. They're exaggerating the safety issue just because they don't want to pay for the repair.

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If they had a permanent fix for the problem, I'd agree with the sentiment that we should replace and await reimbursement if a recall were to happen... problem is that it is not an inexpensive repair, and there has been little or no improvement in the latch design AFAIK.

 

While I completely agree Ford should have come up with a new part and/or extended the warranty......

 

Since they haven't what choice do you have?

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The NHTSA opened an investigation on the Edge door ajar issue in October.

 

The dealer cost (I believe) is around $400.

 

However it's an easy fix, abet time consuming and there are seveal videos on YouTube on how to remove the door panel and replace the switch attached to the latch. Looks like a two hour job.

 

Edited by enigma-2
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So a follow up...

 

I went to my Ford dealer today and inquired about the door latch issue. They of course do admit its a problem, and that the first step they can take is some sort of electrical contact cleaning process that takes about 20 minuets. BUT... they admit this may or may not solve the issue, and it would be better to just replace the latch.

 

I used the information from you all here on the forum to ask some more questions of their mechanic, not the service department rep.

 

The mechanic admitted that the original latches and sensors are not a 'sealed" unit, so dirt, debris, and corrosion get into the latch and degrade the sensor contact to the point that it no longer functions...this is why they recommend replacement as opposed to cleaning the contacts. This corrosion also seems to occur mostly (but not always) on the door most used by the customer (ie, drivers door), since its opened the most and exposed to the elements most often.

 

I then asked if the new latch, (having read on here that the part number has changed, indicating some change in the part), was a "sealed" unit, to prevent further corrosion. He said it is NOT, it's simply a different sensor, and possibly more robust than the one originally installed on the car.

They cannot however, guarantee that this one will not fail after extended use as he has had to replace multiple door latches on some Fleet Edges and Explorers that he's already replaced before.

 

In short, even with a replaced latch, it may fail further down the line due to its "unsealed' design as he put it. The best advice the dealer mechanic could offer, from what he has seen, is to keep the latch clean and lubricated...and basically try not to leave your door open in the rain...and after car washes, open the door and dry out the door frame and where the latch secures to the frame of the car to prevent moisture from getting in.

Edited by rldechant
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There have been others in the past who have claimed it's a serious safety issue to the point they are afraid to drive the vehicle. Yet they continue driving it hoping for Ford to issue a recall so they can get it done for free.

 

I have no problem with folks saying it's a safety issue. It is although I think it's pretty minimal, therefore I have no problem with folks asking for a recall.

 

I think at the least they should engineer a better part and extend the warranty to 100K miles. No disagreement there.

 

Where I have a problem is when people use the "serious safety issue" angle to the point they say they're afraid for their safety while driving yet they don't bother to spend a few hundred bucks to fix the problem for at least a few more years. They're exaggerating the safety issue just because they don't want to pay for the repair.

 

Yeah, I get what you're saying Akirby... I wasn't trying to suggest that I was just gonna sit on my rear and not get it fixed, just frustrated (as I can see many are on here are), that a component that seems to be linked to a crucial system on the car was designed so poorly that its failing all over the place...and no long term solution seems to have been presented by Ford as of yet...

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Yeah, I get what you're saying Akirby... I wasn't trying to suggest that I was just gonna sit on my rear and not get it fixed, just frustrated (as I can see many are on here are), that a component that seems to be linked to a crucial system on the car was designed so poorly that its failing all over the place...and no long term solution seems to have been presented by Ford as of yet...

 

Sorry about that - I admit I did overreact a bit to what you actually said based on what others have said in the past.

 

And I share the frustration that Ford doesn't always seem to fix these problems with a better part that won't fail again. It's a lot easier to accept a one time repair instead of an ongoing repair. That's happened with several parts on several different vehicles the last decade.

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Sorry about that - I admit I did overreact a bit to what you actually said based on what others have said in the past.

 

And I share the frustration that Ford doesn't always seem to fix these problems with a better part that won't fail again. It's a lot easier to accept a one time repair instead of an ongoing repair. That's happened with several parts on several different vehicles the last decade.

 

All good....I'll keep you all updated as to what the mechanic finds when he replaces the latch...(ie corrosion, wear, etc)

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This is a YouTube video where "fix it angel" shows how to remove the door latch and replace the switch attached to the latch. Ag the end of the video, he tears open the switch and it clearly shows the corrrosion located inside the switch.

 

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