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Rough Idle When Cold/P0301 Code - coolant intrusion - TSB 22-2133

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I have a 2019 Edge SE that has been giving me problems since day one. I took it in 2 weeks after i bought it because it didnt sound good, they change some high pressure fuel thing, explained that is was still doing the same thing and getting worst. I have had several open tickets on it with manufacture and never anything was always told that it is normal. However here we are in 2022 and now its so bad that it keeps throwing a power train malfunction wrench on the dash and my ford pass app is telling me that my cars health check is all good and the fluid levels are all ok but they are not because the coolant level has been going down for months and there is no leak and now the car is idling high so it jerks when going form park to reverse and when driving the car shifts so crazy and the rpm gauge is moving up and down. Can anyone tell me what i should do i feel like im at my whits end with ford

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Depending upon the Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) involved in triggering the Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL), and whether your Edge is exhibiting any white smoke/steam out of the tailpipe which may be related to the low coolant condition, you may want to print this Technical Service Bulletin (TSB) and take it with you to the dealership...

 

Document download linkTSB 20-2234 - 2.0L EcoBoost - Illuminated MIL With Various DTCs, Low Coolant Level, White Smoke From Tailpipe, External Coolant Leak.pdf

 

Good luck!

 

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***UPDATE***
 

Well,  we replaced the motor with a new one from Ford.  $6,000 later, it’s still sputtering.   Looks like we are going to be checking the sensors on the transmission now.  Yay!!!!!

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took the paper with me to ford and lets just say that the coolant is leaking out the egr cooler and my torque converter is stuck so 12880 is what they say will cost to fix everything, thank god for mechanical breakdown insurance.😐

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I am looking at a 2019 SEL, I see that 2019 Edge isn't listed in the affected vehicles. Is it because it has the revised Cleveland block, or the VEP block?

 

I am replacing a totaled 2017 Escape that had the 1.5, I had 96,000 miles on it and no issues with the coolant intrusion.

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On 11/17/2022 at 10:38 AM, Edgy2019 said:

***UPDATE***
 

Well,  we replaced the motor with a new one from Ford.  $6,000 later, it’s still sputtering.   Looks like we are going to be checking the sensors on the transmission now.  Yay!!!!!

Who's we?

 

Are you checking the transmission sensors in response to the engine spluttering?

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dabangsta: While the 2019 Edge 2.0L EcoBoost you're considering is not listed as affected in the TSB origins of this discussion thread, 2.0L EcoBoost water intrusion issues for 2019-2020 Edge and 2019-2020 Nautilus are addressed by TSB 20-2234, as mentioned in my prior exchange with cherylwilson91, whose extended warranty coverage is saving her from paying for a significant engine repair.

 

On 11/14/2022 at 10:31 PM, Haz said:

 

As you may already be aware, water intrusion issues on your 2017 Escape's 1.5L EcoBoost were addressed by TSB  22-2322, though as a result of its total-loss collision disposition, title branding may remove any warranty coverage potential if the vehicle is repaired and resold.

 

Document download linkTSB 22-2322 - 1.5L EcoBoost - Low Coolant, White Exhaust Smoke And-Or Illuminated MIL - Built On Or Before 10-Jun-2019 - 08-12 2022.pdf

 

Good luck!

 

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Thank you! I did get the details for that other TSB, trying to get the build date for the vehicle (but that doesn't seem to matter since it was before 7/2020), and since it is within a thousand miles of the 5yr/60k powertrain warranty seeing if it has had the PCM update done. Since they are really not related (the internal "coolant intrusion" because of the way the cooling ports are designed, and the external EGR cooler), I was just wondering why the 2019 Edge was not part of the coolant intrusion when other models with the "same engine" have a part year 2019 affected in the TSB.

 

Buying a used few year old car I get to see what issues have arose, the block issue with coolant (I live in a high ambient temperature climate), flexplate issue, EGR cooler, first year for the 8 speed, etc...I want to be sure I get a vehicle that will last, I tend to drive cars well passed 250,000 miles if they don't get wrecked, so I gotta get it right or agonize for 15 years on where I went wrong.

 

The Escape was past the miles and grandfathered date for the CSP, but since it is totaled it is no longer my worry. However driving it putting miles on it wondering if it was going to happen wasn't a great experience. I took it in very early on for the PCM recalibration for the issue, it seems like all that did was make it circulate coolant longer after shutting it off.

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Hi everyone,

So had to replace engine due to the terrible design of the engine causing leaking into the cylinders as I’m sure a few of you have.

I’ve ran into a bit of a conundrum and I just want to ask on here if anyone had run into the same issue after engine replacement.

I first noticed the issue when it smelled like coolant in the cab so I checked under the hood and indeed the coolant level was low. After some research I found the “TSB” (should have been a recall but you know how dealerships are sadly) I took it in and it was confirmed so long block replacement was done. The issue is, it’s been multiple months and I still smell coolant on start up. Thought maybe it was cabin air filter, so I replaced that to no avail. 
Has anyone experienced the same issue? Just wondering.

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Hey everyone! So my wife's Hyundai Tucson engine blew up so I found a good price on a 2017 Ford Edge Titanium (2.0 L Ecoboost) and decided to pull the trigger. However, it was only after I have been reading a lot about the coolant in the engine issue and I'm terrified! How common is this issue? My car has about 70,000 miles, so if its going to happen, I would assume its going to happen soon. Anything I should do for preventative maintenance? We just came from an engine repair, would hate to have to deal with another engine issue, thanks! 

 

PS: I had a 2018 Mustang Ecoboost (FBO+Protune) and never had any issues, hopefully I get luck again. 

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First, I've got a 2016 Edge with the 2.0 Cleveland.  Car currently has 35K miles.  I'm the second owner as my father bought it new and didn't put a lot of miles on it. 

 

I've also got a P0302 code.  I'm just now reading this thread and seeing all the mention of coolant leak which is not encouraging, but also not sure if that's where I'm at...

 

My misfire started November 2021.  Went to autozone and replaced #2 coil per their diagnostics.  The car ran fine afterwards for a short while.  When it started happening again, I swapped plugs and coils from #1 and #2 to see if the code followed the coil and/or plug.  It didn't, the code stayed at #2.  Eventually I ended up replacing all plugs and coils and in doing so noted no damage on either the plugs or coils.  And thinking back, saw no signs of coolant...  My last occurrence with this episode was in Feb 2022.  Car behaved with no issues until it came back last month (Dec 2022).  

 

I've not noticed any smell or sounds of water.  I looked at my coolant reservoir and it's low...it has about 2" of coolant in it whereas the minimum line is at about 3".  I've never added any.  I did an oil change last month and it was black...no signs of milkiness. 

 

I took it to my Ford dealer last year and they didn't find or suspect anything different as I relayed to them what I had done with the swapping of the coils and they couldn't get the car to duplicate the miss.

 

And to add, I have successfully cleared the miss by pulling over and turning the engine on and off several times until the miss disappears (not feeling it at startup idle).  I traveled on the interstate this week and the miss started on two different occasions...each time I was able to pull onto the side of the road, turn the engine on and off and continue on without the miss.  

 

It's also more likely to happen if I turn the heat or the heated seats on.  Almost guaranteed to happen if I do those things. 

 

I'll top off the fluid and watch it and see if I have this going on.  Seems likely on this thread, but I would've thought if there was a coolant leak, my level would be a lot lower?

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Quote

 

First, I've got a 2016 Edge with the 2.0 Cleveland.  Car currently has 35K miles.  I'm the second owner as my father bought it new and didn't put a lot of miles on it. 

 

I've also got a P0302 code.  I'm just now reading this thread and seeing all the mention of coolant leak which is not encouraging, but also not sure if that's where I'm at...

 

My misfire started November 2021.  Went to autozone and replaced #2 coil per their diagnostics.  The car ran fine afterwards for a short while.  When it started happening again, I swapped plugs and coils from #1 and #2 to see if the code followed the coil and/or plug.  It didn't, the code stayed at #2.  Eventually I ended up replacing all plugs and coils and in doing so noted no damage on either the plugs or coils.  And thinking back, saw no signs of coolant...  My last occurrence with this episode was in Feb 2022.  Car behaved with no issues until it came back last month (Dec 2022).  

 

I've not noticed any smell or sounds of water.  I looked at my coolant reservoir and it's low...it has about 2" of coolant in it whereas the minimum line is at about 3".  I've never added any.  I did an oil change last month and it was black...no signs of milkiness. 

 

I took it to my Ford dealer last year and they didn't find or suspect anything different as I relayed to them what I had done with the swapping of the coils and they couldn't get the car to duplicate the miss.

 

And to add, I have successfully cleared the miss by pulling over and turning the engine on and off several times until the miss disappears (not feeling it at startup idle).  I traveled on the interstate this week and the miss started on two different occasions...each time I was able to pull onto the side of the road, turn the engine on and off and continue on without the miss.  

 

It's also more likely to happen if I turn the heat or the heated seats on.  Almost guaranteed to happen if I do those things. 

 

 

I'll top off the fluid and watch it and see if I have this going on.  Seems likely on this thread, but I would've thought if there was a coolant leak, my level would be a lot lower?

The "coolant intrusion" issue generally only leaks coolant into the cylinders, and wouldn't show up as coolant in the oil.

 

Did the spark plug from 2 look cleaner than the others?

 

I still wouldn't associate your symptoms with the coolant leaking into the cylinders, 1 inch of coolant in the reservoir is probably close to a quart if it anything like my 2017 Escape (which I added maybe a pint to twice in 90k miles, it had the 1.5 which is even more likely to have issues).

 

I am wondering what the dealer checked other than trying to duplicate the miss. They should have done the coolant combustion/pressure check which would tell you a lot.

Edited by dabangsta
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Below as PDF document download links are relevant sections from the 2016 Gasoline Powertrain Control / Emissions Diagnosis (PC/ED) Manual, and PCM Connector details from 2016 Edge Workshop Manual...

 

image.png.2f2ce9b40d63a83b98c90357436512cf.png

 

Document download links>

POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM) DTC P0301 Description-Action - 2016 2.0L EcoBoost - PC-ED Manual.pdf

PINPOINT TEST HD - MISFIRE DETECTION MONITOR - 2016 2.0L EcoBoost - PC-ED Manual.pdf

PINPOINT TEST Z - INTERMITTENT - 2016 2.0L EcoBoost - PC-ED Manual.pdf

OBDII Freeze Frame Data - 2.0L Ecoboost - 2016 PC-ED Manual.pdf

Reference Values - 2.0L Ecoboost - Section 6 - 2016 PC-ED Manual.pdf

POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM) Connector C1381B Details - 2.0 EcoBoost - 2016 Edge Workshop Manual.pdf

POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM) Connector C1381B Location Illustration - 2.0 EcoBoost - 2016 Edge Workshop Manual.pdf

POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM) Connector C1381E Details - 2.0 EcoBoost - 2016 Edge Workshop Manual.pdf

POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM) Connector C1381E Location Illustration - 2.0 EcoBoost - 2016 Edge Workshop Manual.pdf

 

While I cannot offer any personal insights on these documents, I hope this information assists you toward resolving your Edge's indicated misfire condition.

 

Your mention that running seat heater and/or max climate blower directly causes the issue to occur, makes me wonder about the age/condition of your Edge's battery and/or charging components, just in case a low voltage condition may be inducing the miss, in whatever way it might.  Again, simply a curiosity, based upon your comment.

 

If I missed another document or section referenced within these, just let me know.

 

Good luck!

 

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For a fuller understanding of how misfire events are recognized, evaluated, and reacted to by electronic engine controls -- technical, but eye-opening...

 

Document download link> Misfire Monitor - OBD Operation Summary for Gasoline Engines - 2016 Model Year.pdf

 

Good luck!

 

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For a fuller understanding of how misfire events are recognized, evaluated, and reacted to by electronic engine controls -- technical, but eye-opening...

 

Document download link> Misfire Monitor - OBD Operation Summary for Gasoline Engines - 2016 Model Year.pdf

 

Good luck!

 

Haz-  Lots of info on that misfire monitor including shutting off the one fuel injector.    I haven't been able to schedule an appt yet with my local dealer though I've offered to drop the car off for the mechanic to just randomly drive when he goes somewhere (even take it home).  Anyway, if it were the coolant issue that is prevalent, wouldn't that be a consistent problem and not a hit or miss problem as I seem to be having?  Example, yesterday...37 degrees out...first trip from home didn't turn on heat or defrost (trips are small...5 minutes, 2 miles) it didn't have an issue.  Second trip a couple hours later I turn the heater/defrost on and within a minute it starts hesitating/missing.  Turn heat off, turn engine off.  Cycle on and off a few times and it's good again.  Now it will still occur without the heat, but it's more likely to happen if the heat is on.

Again, it cycled this some last year, but subsequently it didn't surface from March to December so it didn't seem to be something involving the warmer temps or the a/c side of the system.  But again, there would have been plenty of times there when I ran the heat still on cooler days, it just didn't pop up.

It baffles me a little with it not being continuous.  At least it seems better that it may not be the combustion chamber leakage.  

And no, when I changed plugs they all looked comparable.  None no better or worse looking than the others.  Which they would've only had about 25k miles on at the time.

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Hello, newbie to this forum here.

My Edge tossed out a code of P0301 on my ECM which equates to a "Misfire on #1 Cylinder".

Took it to my local dealer, who found out the reason behind the code.

Turns out, the engine block is cracked and allowing a small amount of coolant to enter the #1 cylinder.

Long story short, I'm getting a new engine and it falls within my 60,000 mile Powertrain warranty.

In my humble opinion, this is MAJOR surgery by any dealership.

So, my question is has this happened to anyone else on this forum, and what, if any, new problems arose AFTER the engine replacement?

Comments?

TYIA!

 

Edited by wingman54
typo, listed incorrect P code.
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On 11/3/2022 at 1:33 PM, Lincoln_ said:

 

 

On 2/20/2023 at 8:43 AM, wingman54 said:

Hello, newbie to this forum here.

My Edge tossed out a code of P0301 on my ECM which equates to a "Misfire on #1 Cylinder".

Took it to my local dealer, who found out the reason behind the code.

Turns out, the engine block is cracked and allowing a small amount of coolant to enter the #1 cylinder.

Long story short, I'm getting a new engine and it falls within my 60,000 mile Powertrain warranty.

In my humble opinion, this is MAJOR surgery by any dealership.

So, my question is has this happened to anyone else on this forum, and what, if any, new problems arose AFTER the engine replacement?

Comments?

TYIA!

 

 

Yes this has happened to many if you search around - the crack in the block was likely the coolant instrusion noted in the Technical Service Bulliten.  Happened to our 2016 last August right at 70,000 miles.  Carmax extended warranty saved us $8K in repair costs, and it was at the dealership for about a month for the engine replacement.

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I just went through this nightmare with Ford !  My 2018 Ford Edge Titanium with the 2.0L ecoboost engine was completely problem free until 72,000 miles. Then suddenly i noticed that the coolant level was gradually dropping . At first I added coolant every 3-5 days but this began to increase significantly. Also I began to get misfire trouble coded ( P301) for cylinder number one followed by white smoke out the exhaust just after startup.  I immediately educated myself on the diagnosis from several credible you tube content providers on the subject.  The most current TSB of FORD indicates that the engine block is compremised ( due to poor engineering of the coolant passages ) and that only a complete long block replacement is the solution .  Depending on your dealer , this overall cost ranges from $6500 - $7700 !!!  After multiple discussions with FORD customer service they advised me that they could offer NO PARTICIPATION in resolving this problem and implementing the TSB ( NO FINANCIAL SUPPORT) and that the cost of a replacement engine was 100% my problem !!  There are several class action lawsuits in process regarding the coolant intrusion issues of the 1.5L ecoboost engines and now there are two ( one in Delaware and one in California ) regarding the 2.0 L ecoboost.  With zero alternatives I had my engine replaced at my cost.  Trust me when I tell you that I will be participating in any legal action against FORD on this subject. They basically had an engineering screw-up , that 'never' showed up in their engine testing and now are just hoping the luckless customers disappear . That wont be happening in my case. 

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On 10/23/2021 at 2:11 PM, Dulce said:

I’m not even bothering, from the sound of it Ford is not taking responsibility for problem. I wish everyone the best on this issue, really sad. But for a huge company like Ford, I’m sure they don’t care about the little guy. So this issue is not a priority to them meaning the loss is minimal to them. So sad 😭 

See My Post !

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On 1/6/2023 at 9:23 AM, ImSuperCereal said:

Hi everyone,

So had to replace engine due to the terrible design of the engine causing leaking into the cylinders as I’m sure a few of you have.

I’ve ran into a bit of a conundrum and I just want to ask on here if anyone had run into the same issue after engine replacement.

I first noticed the issue when it smelled like coolant in the cab so I checked under the hood and indeed the coolant level was low. After some research I found the “TSB” (should have been a recall but you know how dealerships are sadly) I took it in and it was confirmed so long block replacement was done. The issue is, it’s been multiple months and I still smell coolant on start up. Thought maybe it was cabin air filter, so I replaced that to no avail. 
Has anyone experienced the same issue? Just wondering.

Yes sir - I just posted my story

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So after reading around this forum, I believe my 2018 2.0 may be next. :( at 97,000 miles i just got a P303 code. The coolant level looks just a hair below the minimum line and I last topped it off about a month ago. I bought this car pre-owned from my local Ford Dealer and it came with 100,000 CPO Powertrain warranty. My question is, If this coolant intrusion is my problem, will this cpo warranty cover it?

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1 hour ago, JayTheWorldsHero said:

So after reading around this forum, I believe my 2018 2.0 may be next. :( at 97,000 miles i just got a P303 code. The coolant level looks just a hair below the minimum line and I last topped it off about a month ago. I bought this car pre-owned from my local Ford Dealer and it came with 100,000 CPO Powertrain warranty. My question is, If this coolant intrusion is my problem, will this cpo warranty cover it?

You have 2 of the issues listed for the TSB, low coolant and a DTC for a misfire. That much coolant loss in a month is probably excessive. The action is having one of the affected vehicles (you do), 2.0 (you do), and presence of coolant in the engine cylinders. I think with your 2 issues that is enough to get them to look at it, they should first do a 5 hour pressure test, if it fails, then scope the cylinder for proof of coolant entering cylinder(s).

 

I don't know if CPO warranty is the same as the "New Vehicle Limited Warranty" which they just do the work without requiring a prior approval or cost cap.

 

With only 3000 miles remaining, you don't have the luxury of refilling the coolant and seeing what happens, I don't know what all you need to do to get it documented with the current mileage and symptoms if they can't get it in in a reasonable time. My dealer told me I should get pictures of the mileage, Email her, text message her, every way to contact her so she had a paper trail.

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Welcome to the Forum, JayTheWorldsHero!

 

TSB 22-2229 - 2015-2018 Edge + Other Models, 2.0L EcoBoost - Coolant In Cylinders, White Exhaust Smoke And_Or Illuminated MIL.pdf (document download link) describes these various applicable warranty coverages...

 

Warranty Status: Eligible under provisions of New Vehicle Limited Warranty (NVLW)/Emissions Warranty/Service Part Warranty (SPW)/Special Service Part (SSP)/Extended Service Plan (ESP) coverage. Limits/policies/prior approvals are not altered by a TSB. NVLW/Emissions Warranty/SPW/SSP/ESP coverage limits are determined by the identified causal part and verified using the OASIS part coverage tool. For repairs covered by the NVLW, completion of the procedure outlined in this TSB does not require obtaining Prior Approval or completion of a Cost Cap.

 

Your Edge's 7-year/100,000 miles Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) Powertrain coverage falls under the TSB's "Extended Service Plan (ESP)" coverage category, and your Edge's CPO Powertrain generic covered- parts list should be...

 

Engine: Cylinder block and internal lubricated parts, seals and gaskets, the cylinder heads, manifold (exhaust, intake and bolts), factoryinstalled turbocharger/supercharger units, timing chain (gears or belt), fywheel, valve covers, oil pan, timing chain cover, oil pump, water pump, thermostat, thermostat housing. (Exceptions: fuel injection components are not covered.)

Transmission: Transmission case and all internal parts, including torque converter and transfer case (all internal parts), seals, gaskets and transmission control module.

Front-Wheel Drive: Front drive housing and rear axle housing for AWD (including all internal parts), universal and constant velocity joints, axle shafs, locking rings (four-wheel-drive vehicles), seals and gaskets, and automatic front locking hubs (four-wheel drive).

Rear-Wheel Drive: Drive axle housings and front axle housing for 4x4 (including all internal parts), universal and constant velocity joints, axle shafts, seals and gaskets, and driveshafts.

 

As dabangsta mentioned, a 5-hour coolant system pressure test exhibiting a 4 psi leak-down is among the TSB's necessary qualifying symptoms.

 

If you're a curious do-it-yourself owner -- or your dealer's Service scheduling is seriously backed up -- your neighborhood auto parts store may offer a cooling system pressure tester through their tool loaning program that may require a refundable deposit equal to the tool's full purchase price.

 

If that interests you, the following is Ford's procedure from the 2018 Edge Workshop Manual...

 

Cooling System Pressure Test

 

WARNING: Always allow the engine to cool before opening the cooling system. Do not unscrew the coolant pressure relief cap when the engine is operating or the cooling system is hot. The cooling system is under pressure; steam and hot liquid can come out forcefully when the cap is loosened slightly. Failure to follow these instructions may result in serious personal injury.

 

NOTE: Vehicles have a pressure relief cap on the degas bottle and no radiator cap.

  1. Turn the engine OFF.
  1. Check the engine coolant level and adjust as necessary.
  1. Remove the degas bottle cap. Inspect the degas bottle cap and degas bottle for any issues that would cause improper sealing, such as for cross-threading, burrs, damaged o-ring, etc. If any issues are found, INSTALL a new cap and/or degas bottle.
  1. Attach the Pressure Tester (Stant 12270 or equivalent) and adaptor (Snap-On TA53 or equivalent), to the degas bottle cap. The cap must hold pressure of 145 kPa +/- 21 kPa (21 PSI +/- 3 PSI). If any issues are found, INSTALL a new cap.
  1. Attach the Pressure Tester (Stant 12270 or equivalent) and adaptor (Snap-On TA52, AST ASSFZ-47, Redline RDL95-0750 or equivalent) to the degas bottle.

385586893_CoolantPressureTester.jpg.9fc942d340f44fc67c572ec2332fda56.jpg

 

NOTICE: Do not pressurize the cooling system beyond the maximum pressure listed in the specifications table in this section, or cooling system components can be damaged.

 

NOTE: If the plunger of the pressure tester is pressed too fast, an erroneous pressure reading will result.

  1. To pressurize the engine cooling system, slowly press the plunger of the pressure test pump and increase the pressure to between 124 - 138 kPa (18 - 20 PSI). Observe the gauge reading for approximately 2 minutes. Pressure should not drop during this time. If the pressure drops within this time, inspect for leaks and repair as necessary.
  1. Allow the vehicle to sit for a minimum of 5 hours, or overnight.

NOTE: 2-4 psi of pressure drop is normal and expected after engine cool down.

  1. If the pressure drops more than the expected range of 2-4 psi and no leaks are found and the pressure drops, the leak may be internal to the engine. Inspect the coolant for engine oil and the engine oil for coolant.
    REFER to: Engine (303-00 Engine System - General Information, Diagnosis and Testing).
  1. If the pressure does not drop, remove the cooling system Pressure Tester and adaptor from degas bottle.
  1. Install the degas bottle cap until it contacts the hard stop.

 

And finally, before your Edge reaches its CPO 100,000 mile Powertrain coverage limit, you have the opportunity to renew with FordProtect PowertrainCare coverage without any inspection requirement.

 

Document download links>

Cooling System Pressure Test - 2018 Edge Workshop Manual.pdf

Ford Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) Consumer Brochure - October 2018.pdf

FordProtect PowertrainCARE Brochure - October 2022.pdf

 

Good luck!

 

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